Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Aggression, rule-breaking common among Taiwanese teenagers who have early sex

Date:
March 4, 2014
Source:
Springer Science+Business Media
Summary:
Sex in teenage years can influence emotions and behavior of Asian youngsters, a new study has demonstrated. Nearly 19,000 sixteen- to nineteen-year-old Taiwanese adolescents took part in a national survey. The team found that sexual initiation during adolescence was consistently associated with externalizing problems including rule-breaking and aggressive behavior. This was especially true for adolescents who started having sex at a very young age, and for females.

Taiwanese teenagers -- and especially females -- who become sexually active at a very young age are more likely to be rule-breakers and be more aggressive than their peers. These are the findings of a national study of Taiwanese youth led by Wei J. Chen of the National Taiwan University, with Chia-Hua Chan as first author. It is published in Springer's journal Archives of Sexual Behavior.

Nearly 19,000 sixteen- to nineteen-year-old Taiwanese adolescents took part in a national survey which was conducted through a self-administered web-based questionnaire. Sociodemographic data and information on respondents' sexual experience and substance abuse was collected. Adolescent emotional and behavioral problems were assessed using the Youth Self-Report that focuses on eight syndromes associated with teenagers, ranging from anxiety and somatic complaints to having social problems or showing rule-breaking and aggressive behavior.

The percentage of adolescents reporting to have sexual experience in this study was relatively low -- up to 5.8 percent of tenth graders and 11.4 percent of twelfth graders. Compared with that in Western societies, the figures were 42.8 percent of American tenth graders and 63.1 percent of twelfth graders, according to a 2005 national survey. The researchers say the Taiwanese figures might be underreported due to perceived stigmatization or negative social attitudes that are part of many East Asian societies.

Chen's team found that sexual initiation during adolescence was consistently associated with externalizing problems including rule-breaking and aggressive behavior. This was especially true for adolescents who started having sex at a very young age, and for females. Adolescents who were withdrawn or socially isolated tended to delay their first sexual experiences more than others.

Youths who became sexually active before age 16 had a much more risky sociobehavioral profile than their peers. This included having more sexual partners, truancy, coming from a single-parent family, and using a variety of substances. Chan and her colleagues believe this might be because younger people are still not good at impulse control and decision making. Adolescents with same-sex partners, regardless of being male or female, reported more internalizing problems such as being withdrawn or being anxious and/or depressed. Bisexual males reported struggling with a whole range of syndromes, while female bisexual youths were only found to be especially aggressive.

The researchers hope their findings will guide efforts to develop preventive and interventional sex education programs aimed at adolescents' distinct needs.

"Although sexual initiation in adolescence is less common in Taiwan, the results indicate that the sexually experienced adolescents were associated with a cluster of adverse sociobehavioral consequences, similar to those found in Western societies," writes Chan. "These adolescents exhibited a higher level of emotional or behavioral problems that deserve more attention in order to improve their health and well-being."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Springer Science+Business Media. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Chia-Hua Chan, Te-Tien Ting, Yen-Tyng Chen, Chuan-Yu Chen, Wei J. Chen. Sexual Initiation and Emotional/Behavioral Problems in Taiwanese Adolescents: A Multivariate Response Profile Analysis. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 2014; DOI: 10.1007/s10508-014-0265-7

Cite This Page:

Springer Science+Business Media. "Aggression, rule-breaking common among Taiwanese teenagers who have early sex." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304094533.htm>.
Springer Science+Business Media. (2014, March 4). Aggression, rule-breaking common among Taiwanese teenagers who have early sex. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304094533.htm
Springer Science+Business Media. "Aggression, rule-breaking common among Taiwanese teenagers who have early sex." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304094533.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

AFP (July 28, 2014) The worst-ever outbreak of the deadly Ebola epidemic grips west Africa, killing hundreds. Duration: 00:48 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins