Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New biomarker holds promise for monitoring heart disease

Date:
March 11, 2014
Source:
Baylor Health Care System
Summary:
A special newly discovered biomarker, “Gb3,” potentially related to the survival of heart disease patients, could change the way the country’s No. 1 killer is monitored in the future. The study found that patients with a higher level of the urinary lipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) may be at greater risk for near-term death as a result of heart disease. The presence of elevated urinary Gb3, along with other lipids, indicated for the first time that heart disease is linked to lipid abnormalities in organs outside of the heart in patients with common forms of heart disease.

A special newly discovered biomarker, "Gb3," potentially related to the survival of heart disease patients, could change the way the country's No. 1 killer is monitored in the future, according to research published in the Feb. 4 edition of the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA).

Led by principal investigator Raphael Schiffmann, MD, (Director of Baylor's Institute for Metabolic Disease, part of Baylor Research Institute), the study found that patients with a higher level of the urinary lipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) may be at greater risk for near-term death as a result of heart disease. The presence of elevated urinary Gb3, along with other lipids, indicated for the first time that heart disease is linked to lipid abnormalities in organs outside of the heart in patients with common forms of heart disease.

Originally, the trial was designed as a screening study for Fabry disease, a rare genetic condition that triggers heart complications. Investigators performed urinary analyses in search of elevated Gb3 levels, which is common in Fabry disease patients.

"To our surprise, we noticed after a few months that some heart disease patients who did not have Fabry disease did have elevated Gb3 in the urine," Dr. Schiffmann said. "Simultaneously, we also found that some of those patients had died in the short interval that had passed since we had last seen them for this screening study."

With excellent statistical support, Dr. Schiffmann and his team then found that heart disease patients with higher Gb3 levels face a higher risk of death, compared to those without elevated volumes of the lipid in their urine.

"This was a very surprising, yet encouraging, discovery, given the fact that Gb3 elevation was -- until now -- thought to be the exclusive hallmark of Fabry disease," Dr. Schiffmann said. "Remarkably, this biomarker is significantly different from existing ones and could be of great significance for the future study of heart disease."

Dr. Schiffmann added that continued research is needed in order to fully explore Gb3 and other lipids as heart disease biomarkers. The research was performed as a result of collaboration between Baylor's cardiology network through Baylor Health Care System and the Institute of Metabolic Disease.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Baylor Health Care System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. R. Schiffmann, S. Forni, C. Swift, N. Brignol, X. Wu, D. J. Lockhart, D. Blankenship, X. Wang, P. A. Grayburn, M. R. G. Taylor, B. D. Lowes, M. Fuller, E. R. Benjamin, L. Sweetman. Risk of Death in Heart Disease is Associated With Elevated Urinary Globotriaosylceramide. Journal of the American Heart Association, 2014; 3 (1): e000394 DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.113.000394

Cite This Page:

Baylor Health Care System. "New biomarker holds promise for monitoring heart disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140311184633.htm>.
Baylor Health Care System. (2014, March 11). New biomarker holds promise for monitoring heart disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140311184633.htm
Baylor Health Care System. "New biomarker holds promise for monitoring heart disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140311184633.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins