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Low intensive care unit staffing levels affect patient survival

Date:
April 2, 2014
Source:
University of Greenwich
Summary:
Patients in intensive care have a better chance of survival if there are more doctors and nurses working on the unit, new research shows.

Patients in Intensive Care have a better chance of survival if there are more doctors and nurses working on the unit, new research shows.

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The study, led by the University of Greenwich, also shows that the survival of the most severely ill patients is most affected when there are insufficient nurses.

Researchers have been able to separate out staffing levels from other factors, such as workload and how ill patients are, for the first time after examining nearly 40,000 patient records and data from 65 ICUs in the UK.

Professor Elizabeth West, who led the research, says: "This is timely because the public are concerned about the ability of the NHS to provide safe and compassionate care. Recent catastrophic failures such as events at Mid-Staffordshire have highlighted the importance of staffing levels to patient survival, and this study has reinforced that message."

This is the first study of patient survival in ICUs to look at the numbers of doctors as well as nurses. Professor West says that doctors and nurses work closely together and function as a team on ICUs more than on other wards: "Future studies need to see the whole picture and examine how the multi-disciplinary team works together." It is also the first study to show that there is a sub-group of patients -- those who are the most severely ill -- who are most affected by low levels of nurse staffing.

She believes the new evidence will be essential to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) when it draws up guidance on safe staffing levels later this year.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Greenwich. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elizabeth West, David N. Barron, David Harrison, Anne Marie Rafferty, Kathy Rowan, Colin Sanderson. Nurse staffing, medical staffing and mortality in Intensive Care: An observational study. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 2014; 51 (5): 781 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.02.007

Cite This Page:

University of Greenwich. "Low intensive care unit staffing levels affect patient survival." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140402095246.htm>.
University of Greenwich. (2014, April 2). Low intensive care unit staffing levels affect patient survival. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140402095246.htm
University of Greenwich. "Low intensive care unit staffing levels affect patient survival." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140402095246.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

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