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What happens when we try to manipulate our voice to attract a mate? Her voice is hot, his is not

Date:
April 11, 2014
Source:
Albright College
Summary:
Trying to sound sexier? Sorry, guys, it seems you just don't have what it takes. New research suggests that men cannot intentionally make their voices sound more sexy or attractive, while women have little trouble. And true to the stereotype, women will lower their pitch and increase their hoarseness to dial up the allure.

Trying to sound sexier? Sorry, guys, it seems you just don't have what it takes. New research suggests that men cannot intentionally make their voices sound more sexy or attractive, while women have little trouble.
Credit: Photographee.eu / Fotolia

Trying to sound sexier? Sorry, guys, it seems you just don't have what it takes.

New research suggests that men cannot intentionally make their voices sound more sexy or attractive, while women have little trouble. And true to the stereotype, women will lower their pitch and increase their hoarseness to dial up the allure.

"This ability may be due to culture and cuts across cultures and time," says Susan Hughes, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology at Albright College. "There is a stereotype of what is a sexual voice in our culture -- a low, breathy voice."

The findings appear in the article "The Perception and Parameters of Intentional Voice Manipulation" appearing in this month's Journal of Nonverbal Behavior. The research examines the patterns that emerge when men and women intentionally modify their voices to project four traits related to mate selection and competition -- sexiness, dominance, intelligence and confidence -- and how others perceive these manipulations.

For the study, 40 participants (20 men, 20 women) provided intentionally manipulated voice samples for the desired traits, plus a normal speech sample. Each sample consisted of participants counting from one to 10. Another 40 people assessed the degree to which each sample effectively projected the given trait.

The researchers found that women could make their voices sound more attractive, but men could not. "In fact, although not significantly, it got a bit worse when men tried to sound sexy," says Hughes.

The difference may be rooted in mate selection, the study says. Women know that men place greater emphasis on attractiveness when choosing a partner, and that voice attractiveness can predict physical attractiveness. Thus, it is beneficial for women to sound sexier to enhance their value to potential mates and to stave off competition from rival females.

Spectrogram analyses of the samples revealed that both sexes slowed their speech to sound sexy/attractive, while women also lowered their pitch and increased their hoarseness. Ironically, men prefer higher-pitch females, but a woman will signal her interest in a man by intentionally dropping her voice, said Hughes.

The study found that both sexes can manipulate their voices to sound more intelligent. Women, however, could not sound more confident. Men could, but only when judged by female raters. This may be true, according to the study, because it's important for men to project confidence to women (and for women to perceive it), since confidence can indicate financial and personal success, which women value in a potential partner. Men, on the other hand, may be more attuned to detecting male posturing and more inclined to underrate their competition.

Researchers were surprised to find that both men and women could equally and effectively manipulate their voices to sound more dominant. This may indicate a cultural shift. As more women enter traditionally male-dominated roles and leadership positions, they may choose to modify their voices to sound more formidable. As example, the study points to former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who received vocal training to sound more domineering when coming into office.

The authors believe the study could have practical applications for vocal coaching, including in the fields of public speaking and acting, and in more effectively communicating with an audience.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Albright College. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Susan Hughes, Justin Mogilski, Marissa Harrison. The Perception and Parameters of Intentional Voice Manipulation. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 2014 DOI: 10.1007/s10919-013-0163

Cite This Page:

Albright College. "What happens when we try to manipulate our voice to attract a mate? Her voice is hot, his is not." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140411153320.htm>.
Albright College. (2014, April 11). What happens when we try to manipulate our voice to attract a mate? Her voice is hot, his is not. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140411153320.htm
Albright College. "What happens when we try to manipulate our voice to attract a mate? Her voice is hot, his is not." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140411153320.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

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