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The ilk of human kindness: Older women with gumption score high on compassion

Date:
April 17, 2014
Source:
University of California, San Diego Health Sciences
Summary:
Older women, plucky individuals and those who have suffered a recent major loss are more likely to be compassionate toward strangers than other older adults, new research finds. Because compassionate behaviors are associated with better health and well-being as we age, the research findings offer insights into ways to improve the outcomes of individuals whose deficits in compassion put them at risk for becoming lonely and isolated later in life.

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that older women, plucky individuals and those who have suffered a recent major loss are more likely to be compassionate toward strangers than other older adults.

The study is published in this month’s issue of the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

Because compassionate behaviors are associated with better health and well-being as we age, the research findings offer insights into ways to improve the outcomes of individuals whose deficits in compassion put them at risk for becoming lonely and isolated later in life.

“We are interested in anything that can help older people age more successfully,” said Lisa Eyler, PhD, a professor of psychiatry and co-author. “We know that social connections are important to health and well-being, and we know that people who want to be kind to others garner greater social support. If we can foster compassion in people, we can improve their health and well-being, and maybe even longevity.”

The study, based on a survey of 1,006 randomly selected adults in San Diego County, aged 50 and over, with a mean age of 77, identified three factors that were predictive of a person’s self-reported compassion: gender, recent suffering and high mental resiliency.

Women, independent of their age, income, education, race, marital status or mental health status, scored higher on the compassion test, on average, than men. Higher levels of compassion were also observed among both men and women who had “walked a mile in another person’s shoes” and experienced a personal loss, such as a death in the family or illness, in the last year.

Those who reported higher confidence in their ability to bounce back from hard times also reported more empathy toward strangers and joy from helping those in need.

“What is exciting is that we are identifying aspects of successful aging that we can foster in both men and women,” said co-author Dilip Jeste, MD, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, and director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging. “Mental resiliency can be developed through meditation, mindfulness and stress reduction practices. We can also teach people that the silver lining to adversity is an opportunity for personal growth.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California, San Diego Health Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Raeanne C. Moore, A'verria Sirkin Martin, Allison R. Kaup, Wesley K. Thompson, Matthew E. Peters, Dilip V. Jeste, Shahrokh Golshan, Lisa T. Eyler. From suffering to caring: a model of differences among older adults in levels of compassion. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2014; DOI: 10.1002/gps.4123

Cite This Page:

University of California, San Diego Health Sciences. "The ilk of human kindness: Older women with gumption score high on compassion." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140417164028.htm>.
University of California, San Diego Health Sciences. (2014, April 17). The ilk of human kindness: Older women with gumption score high on compassion. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140417164028.htm
University of California, San Diego Health Sciences. "The ilk of human kindness: Older women with gumption score high on compassion." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140417164028.htm (accessed September 3, 2014).

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