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Heat regulation dysfunction may stop MS patients from exercising

Date:
April 29, 2014
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)
Summary:
Exercise-induced body temperature increases can make symptoms worse for some patients with multiple sclerosis. Researchers have explored the underlying causes of the temperature regulation problems so MS patients can better reap the benefits of exercise. In the study, researchers found that sweating took longer to start and sweat rate was lower during exercise-induced body temperature increases in MS patients compared to healthy control subjects.

Exercise can be beneficial for patients with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative nerve disease that progressively impairs central nervous system function. However, for some patients, a rise in body temperature, which occurs during exercise and/or exposure to hot and humid conditions, can make symptoms temporarily worse. Researchers at Southern Methodist University collaborating with colleagues from University of Sydney set out to explore how moderate exercise affected patients with MS compared with healthy control subjects. Mu Huang, will present the research team's findings in a poster session on Tuesday, April 29, at the Experimental Biology meeting.

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Experimental Biology is an annual meeting comprised of more than 14,000 scientists and exhibitors from six sponsoring societies and multiple guest societies. With a mission to share the newest scientific concepts and research findings shaping current and future clinical advances, the meeting offers an unparalleled opportunity for exchange among scientists from throughout across the United States and the world who represent dozens of scientific areas, from laboratory to translational to clinical research. www.experimentalbiology.org

Huang et al. asked five patients with MS and five control subjects to cycle in a temperature-controlled room for 30-60 minutes. They found that sweating took longer to start and sweat rate was lower during exercise-induced body temperature increases in MS patients compared to healthy control subjects. This altered temperature regulation also led to a greater increase in core temperature among the MS patients vs. controls. Overheating in this way could cause a temporary worsening of symptoms, which may impact the ability to exercise or discourage patients with MS from exercising.

"While preliminary, these findings suggest that a larger rise in body temperature seen in MS patients is due to a lower sweat rate and a delay in the start of sweating thereby limiting the body's ability to cool itself down. A greater understanding of how MS affects the body's ability to dissipate heat during exercise will provide insight into ways of reducing the impact of heat intolerance and improving the safety and benefit of exercise for MS patients," researchers noted.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). "Heat regulation dysfunction may stop MS patients from exercising." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140429161645.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). (2014, April 29). Heat regulation dysfunction may stop MS patients from exercising. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140429161645.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). "Heat regulation dysfunction may stop MS patients from exercising." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140429161645.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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