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Glutamate imaging better than MR spectroscopy in first 3 hours after ischemic stroke

Date:
May 7, 2014
Source:
American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
Glutamate imaging reveals ischemic lesions in the first 3 hours after stroke that are not distinguishable in T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging. The finding has the potential to speed diagnosis -- and, therefore, treatment -- in the critical first hours after a stroke.
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Glutamate imaging reveals ischemic lesions in the first 3 hours after stroke that are not distinguishable in T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging.

Researchers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST), an emerging MRI technology, have found that using glutamate with CEST shows high spatial resolution in vivo. The finding has the potential to speed diagnosis -- and, therefore, treatment -- in the critical first hours after a stroke.

"I have been interested in glutamate imaging since its inception," said researcher Zhuozhi Dai of Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China. "Being able to evaluate glutamate in the brain could be of great benefit in the clinical setting."

Dr. Dai will present the study on Monday, May 5 at the 2014 ARRS Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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American Roentgen Ray Society. "Glutamate imaging better than MR spectroscopy in first 3 hours after ischemic stroke." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140507151603.htm>.
American Roentgen Ray Society. (2014, May 7). Glutamate imaging better than MR spectroscopy in first 3 hours after ischemic stroke. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140507151603.htm
American Roentgen Ray Society. "Glutamate imaging better than MR spectroscopy in first 3 hours after ischemic stroke." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140507151603.htm (accessed August 29, 2015).

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