Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Vascular simulation research reveals new mechanism that switches in disease

Date:
May 8, 2014
Source:
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Summary:
Important revelations regarding endothelial cell behavior are emerging from vascular simulation research, as highlighted in two recent papers. Vascular simulation research is a blossoming interdisciplinary field that makes use of novel computational models to uncover the cellular processes and dynamic interactions that take place as arteries and veins are built.

Blood vessel formation is critical to life and its manipulation is instrumental to a number of diseases. For more than 40 years, investigations into the structure and function of endothelial cells lining the blood vessels have revealed a complex tissue with complex functions, demonstrating that endothelial cells participate in all aspects of vascular homeostasis and pathological processes.

Related Articles


Today, important revelations regarding endothelial cell behavior are emerging from vascular simulation research, a blossoming interdisciplinary field that makes use of novel computational models to uncover the cellular processes and dynamic interactions that take place as arteries and veins are built.

Vascular simulation research is the focus of two recent papers coauthored by investigators in the Center for Vascular Biology Research (CVBR) at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), one of which provides a novel explanation for the enlarged blood vessels that are seen in various pathologies, including tumors and retinopathies.

"Understanding how, when and why individual endothelial cells coordinate decisions to change shape in relation to dynamic tissue environment signals is key to understanding normal and abnormal blood vessel growth," says Katie Bentley, PhD, Group Leader of the Computational Biology Laboratory in the CVBR and Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School. "Such insights could, for example, prove valuable in the treatment of cancer, which relies on a constant supply of blood to support tumor growth and cancerous spread."

Adaptive systems research brings things into focus

Bentley's computational modeling derives from training in Adaptive Systems research, an interdisciplinary field aimed at elucidating the fundamental organizing principles of living systems through the combined use of simulation, robotics and experimental models. Her work focuses on the construction of simulated (Simulant) endothelial cells, capable of generating novel, unexpected behavior, including movement, shape and signaling changes.

"Simulants can be observed individually and as an interacting social collective -- recapitulating a growing blood vessel, for example," she explains. "We can tinker with how we set up their internal workings and then compare the changes this causes in model behavior to real cell behaviors in order to make predictions on how the mechanisms work in real cells."

Together with CVBR investigator Erzsebet Ravasz Regan, PhD, and Andrew Philippides, PhD, of the University of Sussex, UK, Bentley recently published a review article in the April 28 issue of Developmental Cell, which examines the growing field of computer simulations in vascular biology and focuses on providing an accessible account of the illuminating principles and toolsets of the Adaptive Systems field for the cell biology community.

"The Adaptive Systems field traditionally draws on animal/insect behavior and cognition to derive general principles and inspire better robotics capable of intelligent, adaptive behavior," says Bentley. "But we wanted to highlight that it can also be a very useful perspective and mindset to approach cell biology, in other words, to understand single to collective cell behavior in complex systems, such as blood vessel growth. The approach offers useful principles for studying a wide variety of questions about health and disease."

Simulant cells' unexpected behavior reveals new in vivo mechanisms

Using this type of collaborative computational and experimental approach, Bentley and a research team from the laboratory of Holger Gerhardt, PhD, of Cancer Research UK's London Research Institute recently made an unexpected discovery about endothelial cell behavior during angiogenesis. In a study published last month in Nature Cell Biology, they showed that sprouting cells are in a continuum of migratory states, regulated by differential cell-cell adhesions and protrusive activities that drive proper vascular organization.

During blood vessel formation, certain molecules and cues tell endothelial cells to take on different characteristics, with some becoming "polarized tip cells" and other becoming "stalk cells." Together these two cell types form new capillaries. Tip and stalk cells were previously thought to have established roles, with tip cells leading the way and stalk cells following along to create a vessel tube, but recent research has suggested that endothelial cells are much more spontaneous and actually undergo dynamic changes and frequently switch positions, with stalk cells overtaking tip cells at the leading edge of a new blood vessel.

Previous studies of endothelial rearrangements suggested the adhesion molecule VE-cadherin plays a key role in helping endothelial cells to stick together. "Our team had linked rearranging behavior of endothelial cells during vessel sprouting to a signaling pathway called Notch," explains Bentley. "But what Notch regulates to generate movement and how it may interplay with VE-cadherin has remained elusive. It's also been unclear how pathological conditions such as cancer may affect the rearrangement process or whether rearrangement defects may contribute to disease."

Bentley and Gerhardt propose that when endothelial cells are stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -- and not inhibited by Notch signaling -- they are "active" and can either form a new branch as tip cells or "shuffle up" through the existing sprout by cell rearrangement mechanisms. Their new work in Nature Cell Biology validated simulation predictions in vivo, demonstrating that Notch regulates shuffling movement via VE-cadherin adhesion.

"We identified that feedback regulation between VEGF and Notch signaling results in different levels of adhesion [through VE-cadherin] and junctional cortex movements between cells in the sprout, which actually drives the cell rearrangement and tip cell competition," says Bentley. The team also found that during cancer development and progression, there is a switch: the regulation of the adhesion between cells becomes more uniform so that there are clustered regions of cells in an all-active or all-inhibited shuffling state.

"When we let Simulant cells loose in a simple simulated tumor environment, their collective behavior changed dramatically," says Bentley. "The cells go through cyclic phases of adhesion and junctional movements now as a group, in which they all clamber to move at once or all remain still. In either case they are getting nowhere as overtaking requires differential movement of one cell compared to its neighbors. The disrupted rearrangement provides a new explanation for the enlarged blood vessels we see in pathologies, such as in mouse models of tumors or retinopathies."

This research approach offers useful new principles for studying basic and complex questions about health and disease. "We hope that our work provides an example that cell level theory can be made accessible and, when integrated with experimentation, can help us unravel the complexities and dynamics of living systems and disease," adds Bentley.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Katie Bentley, Claudio Areias Franco, Andrew Philippides, Raquel Blanco, Martina Dierkes, Véronique Gebala, Fabio Stanchi, Martin Jones, Irene M. Aspalter, Guiseppe Cagna, Simone Weström, Lena Claesson-Welsh, Dietmar Vestweber, Holger Gerhardt. The role of differential VE-cadherin dynamics in cell rearrangement during angiogenesis. Nature Cell Biology, 2014; 16 (4): 309 DOI: 10.1038/ncb2926
  2. Katie Bentley, Andrew Philippides, Erzsébet Ravasz Regan. Do Endothelial Cells Dream of Eclectic Shape? Developmental Cell, 2014; 29 (2): 146 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2014.03.019

Cite This Page:

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. "Vascular simulation research reveals new mechanism that switches in disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140508132553.htm>.
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (2014, May 8). Vascular simulation research reveals new mechanism that switches in disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140508132553.htm
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. "Vascular simulation research reveals new mechanism that switches in disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140508132553.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins