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Children of parents in technical jobs at higher risk for autism

Date:
May 15, 2014
Source:
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Summary:
Children of fathers who are in technical occupations are more likely to have an autism spectrum disorder, according to researchers. Fathers who worked in engineering were two times as likely to have a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Those who worked in finance were four times more likely and those who worked in health care occupations were six times more likely to have a child on the autism spectrum. There was no association with a mother's occupation.

Children of fathers who are in technical occupations are more likely to have an autism spectrum disorder, according to researchers. Children who had both parents in technical fields were at a higher risk of having a more severe form of autism.
Credit: vitanovski / Fotolia

Children of fathers who are in technical occupations are more likely to have an autism spectrum disorder, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

The findings will be presented Friday at the International Meeting for Autism Research in Atlanta.

During participation in the LoneStar LEND program, first author Aisha S. Dickerson, Ph.D., a researcher at UTHealth's Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences, used the United States government's Standard Occupational Classification system. Parents were divided into those who had more non-people-oriented jobs (technical) or more people-oriented jobs (non-technical).

Fathers who worked in engineering were two times as likely to have a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Those who worked in finance were four times more likely and those who worked in health care occupations were six times more likely to have a child on the autism spectrum.

There was no association with a mother's occupation. However, children who had both parents in technical fields were at a higher risk of having a more severe form of autism.

"Parental occupation could be indicative of autistic-like behaviors and preferences and serve as another factor in a clinician's diagnosis of a child with suspected autism. Medical students can be taught that this is one of the things to consider," Dickerson said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. The original article was written by Deborah Mann Lake. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Children of parents in technical jobs at higher risk for autism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515154132.htm>.
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. (2014, May 15). Children of parents in technical jobs at higher risk for autism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515154132.htm
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Children of parents in technical jobs at higher risk for autism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140515154132.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

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