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New method discovered to protect against chemical weapons

Date:
May 27, 2014
Source:
Oregon State University
Summary:
Researchers have discovered that some compounds called polyoxoniobates can degrade and decontaminate nerve agents such as the deadly sarin gas, and have other characteristics that may make them ideal for protective suits, masks or other clothing. They could ultimately help save both military and civilian lives.

Nerve gas decontamination.
Credit: Image courtesy of Oregon State University

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered that some compounds called polyoxoniobates can degrade and decontaminate nerve agents such as the deadly sarin gas, and have other characteristics that may make them ideal for protective suits, masks or other clothing.

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The use of polyoxoniobates for this purpose had never before been demonstrated, scientists said, and the discovery could have important implications for both military and civilian protection. A United Nations report last year concluded that sarin gas was used in the conflict in Syria.

The study findings were just published in the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry.

Some other compounds exist that can decontaminate nerve gases, researchers said, but they are organic, unstable, degraded by sunlight and have other characteristics that make them undesirable for protective clothing -- or they are inorganic, but cannot be used on fabrics or surfaces.

By contrast, the polyoxoniobates are inorganic, do not degrade in normal environmental conditions, dissolve easily and it should be able to incorporate them onto surfaces, fabrics and other material.

"This is a fundamental new understanding of what these compounds can do," said May Nyman, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry in the OSU College of Science. "As stable, inorganic compounds they have an important potential to decontaminate and protect against these deadly nerve gases."

As a chemical group, polyoxoniobates have been known of since the mid-1900s, Nyman said, but a detailed investigation of their complex chemistry has revealed this new potential. Besides protection against nerve gas, she said, their chemistry might allow them to function as a catalyst that could absorb carbon dioxide and find use in carbon sequestration at fossil-fuel power plants -- but little has been done yet to explore that potential.

A new method to protect against nerve agents could be significant. These organofluorophosphate compounds can be inhaled or absorbed through the skin, and in military use are considered weapons of mass destruction. They can be lethal even at very small levels of exposure.

"In continued work we hope to incorporate the protective compounds onto surfaces or fabrics and explore their function," Nyman said. "They could form the basis for an improved type of gas mask or other protection. We would also need to test the material's ability to withstand very arid environments, extreme heat or other conditions."

A goal will be materials that are durable, high performing and retain a high level of protection against nerve agents such as sarin and soman gas even in harsh environmental conditions, researchers said.

The OSU research demonstrated the ability of polyoxoniobates to neutralize both actual and simulated nerve agents. Testing against actual nerve agents was done at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, a U.S. Army facility designed for that purpose.

OSU has collaborated on this research with Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Army. The work at Edgewood was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, a unit of the U.S. Department of Defense.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Oregon State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mark K. Kinnan, William R. Creasy, Lauren B. Fullmer, Heidi L. Schreuder-Gibson, May Nyman. Nerve Agent Degradation with Polyoxoniobates. European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, 2014; 2014 (14): 2361 DOI: 10.1002/ejic.201400016

Cite This Page:

Oregon State University. "New method discovered to protect against chemical weapons." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140527124144.htm>.
Oregon State University. (2014, May 27). New method discovered to protect against chemical weapons. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140527124144.htm
Oregon State University. "New method discovered to protect against chemical weapons." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140527124144.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

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