Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Soccer-related facial fractures examined

Date:
June 17, 2014
Source:
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Summary:
Fractures of the nose and other facial bones are a relatively common and potentially serious injury in soccer players, reports a Brazilian study. Through their analysis, researchers report that he nose and upper jaw (maxilla) accounted for 35 percent of fractures and the cheekbone (zygomatic bone) for another 35 percent. Most of the remaining fractures were of the lower jaw (mandible) and eye socket (orbit). Eighty-seven percent of the injuries were caused by collision with another player; the rest occurred when the player was struck by the ball.

Fractures of the nose and other facial bones are a relatively common and potentially serious injury in soccer players, reports a Brazilian study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery -- Global Openฎ , the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

On the eve of the 2014 World Cup, a group of Brazilian plastic surgeons review their experience with soccer-related facial fractures requiring surgery. Dr. Dov Charles Goldenberg, MD, PhD, of University of Sใo Paulo and colleagues write, "Due to exposure and the lack of protection for the face, the occasional maxillofacial trauma sustained during soccer games often entails serious facial injuries requiring hospital admissions and invasive procedures."

Soccer Players at Risk of Nasal and Other Facial Fractures

The researchers assembled data on 45 patients undergoing surgical treatment for soccer-related facial fractures at two large university hospital centers in Sใo Paulo between 2000 and 2013. The 45 soccer injuries accounted for two percent of surgically treated facial fractures during that time. Forty-four of the patients were male; the average age was 28 years. All of the injured players were amateurs.

The nose and upper jaw (maxilla) accounted for 35 percent of fractures and the cheekbone (zygomatic bone) for another 35 percent. Most of the remaining fractures were of the lower jaw (mandible) and eye socket (orbit). Eighty-seven percent of the injuries were caused by collision with another player; the rest occurred when the player was struck by the ball.

Nasal fractures were treated by repositioning (reducing) the fractured bones to their proper place and splinting until they healed. Other types of facial fractures required open surgery and internal fixation (plates, screws) to reposition the bones. The patients remained in the hospital for about five days on average, and were told they could return to play after six to eight weeks of healing.

Emphasis on Awareness and Examination to Detect Soccer-Related Fractures

The results are consistent with previous studies of soccer-related facial injuries. Lower extremity injuries (leg and foot) are much more common, fractures and other injuries to the head and face are a significant risk.

First-responders, nurses, and doctors who have initial contact with patients need to be aware of the potential for soccer-related facial fractures and the fracture patterns that occur. "Missed diagnosis or delayed treatment can lead to facial deformities and functional problems in the physiological actions of breathing, vision, and chewing," Dr. Goldenberg and coauthors write. In the study, the average delay between injury and operation was about seven days, and as long as 33 days.

The true number of serious soccer-related facial injuries in Brazil is likely much larger than the number seen at Sใo Paulo referral hospitals, the researchers believe. Many patients may not seek medical care due to socioeconomic factors. In addition, some fractures may be overlooked by primary medical care providers.

The researchers highlight the need for careful examination of the nasal cavity to look for possible septal hematomas (blood collections), which could lead to serious complications. The online, open-access article is accompanied by videos illustrating the authors' approach to diagnosis and management of septal hematomas and the potential consequences of untreated nasal fracture.

The paper appears in PRS-GO as the world turns its attention to Brazil for this year's World Cup. "Soccer is woven into the fabric of Brazilian culture, embedded in the traditions and the language of the country," Dr. Goldenberg and coauthors write. "In 2014, the World Cup will make its way back to Brazil for the first time since 1950, and the omnipresent background of soccer in Brazilian culture will once again be brought to the forefront."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Dov C. Goldenberg, Gal M. Dini, Max D. Pereira, Augusto Gurgel, Endrigo O. Bastos, Purushottam Nagarkar, Rolf Gemperli, Lydia M. Ferreira. Soccer-related Facial Trauma. Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Global Open, 2014; 1 DOI: 10.1097/GOX.0000000000000129

Cite This Page:

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. "Soccer-related facial fractures examined." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617102459.htm>.
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. (2014, June 17). Soccer-related facial fractures examined. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617102459.htm
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. "Soccer-related facial fractures examined." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617102459.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) — A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is blaming doctors for the low number of children being vaccinated for HPV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins