Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Personality and heart attacks: A new look

Date:
July 6, 2014
Source:
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Summary:
A new study has addressed the relationship between personality and heart attacks. Distressed (type D) personality (TDP), characterized by high negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI), along with depression, anxiety and other negative affects (such as demoralization, hopelessness, pessimism and rumination) have been implicated as potential risk factors for coronary artery disease. While some evidence suggests that the NA dimension of TDP overlaps at least partially with depression, other studies underline how ‘TDP refers to a chronic, more covert form of distress that is distinct from depression'.

A new study published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics has addressed the relationship between personality and heart attacks. Distressed (type D) personality (TDP), characterized by high negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI), along with depression, anxiety and other negative affects (such as demoralization, hopelessness, pessimism and rumination) have been implicated as potential risk factors for coronary artery disease. While some evidence suggests that the NA dimension of TDP overlaps at least partially with depression, other studies underline how 'TDP refers to a chronic, more covert form of distress that is distinct from depression'.

In this study, authors aimed to clarify whether, among never depressed patients at their first acute coronary syndrome (ACS), there is an overlap between the constructs of TDP and depression, evaluating the stability of NA and SI 6 months after the ACS, and their relationship with depressive symptoms. Patients consecutively admitted to the Coronary Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital of Parma between January 2009 and March 2012 who had their first ACS and no history of major depression (MD) or other psychiatric disorders, were included.

During the follow-up period 30 patients developed depressive symptoms (MD: n = 12; minor depression (md): n = 18), whereas 220 subjects maintained a nondepressive condition throughout the study period. At baseline the NA and SI levels were higher in subjects who developed depression than in patients who did not. However, at the baseline evaluation 19 patients without previous depressive episodes already satisfied the criteria for md. Interestingly, at baseline these subjects showed higher levels of NA and SI than subjects without md. Among patients who developed depression (n = 30) HADS scores significantly changed during the 6-month follow-up: both anxiety and depression scores increased from baseline to the second month of follow-up and then decreased. The same pattern of change was observed for the NA score, whereas the SI score did not vary during follow-up. In nondepressed patients, both HADS depression and anxiety scores and NA score significantly decreased throughout the follow-period, whereas the SI did not change.

In this study, the overlap between depressive psychopathology and NA features is suggested by the course of these two dimensions over time. Indeed, in both depressed and nondepressed patients, NA levels were not stable during the 6-month follow-up, but they changed along with the variation of HADS scores. This finding suggests that the NA dimension is sensitive to mood-state, because its levels increase and decrease according to the fluctuation of severity of depressive and anxious symptoms. This result supports the view that the disposition to experience and report negative emotions (NA) can be sensitive to mood-state. Therefore, the presence of depressive state is crucial when assessing TDP, since NA and anhedonic depression are partially overlapping and co-varying constructs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Carlo Marchesi, Paolo Ossola, Francesca Scagnelli, Francesca Paglia, Sonja Aprile, Alberto Monici, Matteo Tonna, Giulio Conte, Franco Masini, Chiara De Panfilis, Diego Ardissino. Type D Personality in Never Depressed Patients at Their First Acute Coronary Syndrome. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 2014; 83 (3): 190 DOI: 10.1159/000358525

Cite This Page:

Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "Personality and heart attacks: A new look." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140706083939.htm>.
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. (2014, July 6). Personality and heart attacks: A new look. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140706083939.htm
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "Personality and heart attacks: A new look." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140706083939.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) — An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Newsy (July 18, 2014) — Yale researchers tested 135 men and women, and it was only obese women who were deemed to have "impaired associative learning." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins