Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Visual exposure predicts infants' ability to follow another's gaze

Date:
August 15, 2014
Source:
Association for Psychological Science
Summary:
Following another person's gaze can reveal a wealth of information critical to social interactions and also to safety. Gaze following typically emerges in infancy, and new research looking at preterm infants suggests that it's visual experience, not maturational age, that underlies this critical ability.

Gaze following typically emerges in infancy, and new research looking at preterm infants suggests that it's visual experience, not maturational age, that underlies this critical ability.
Credit: © Syda Productions / Fotolia

Following another person's gaze can reveal a wealth of information critical to social interactions and also to safety. Gaze following typically emerges in infancy, and new research looking at preterm infants suggests that it's visual experience, not maturational age, that underlies this critical ability.

The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

"To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that some aspects of the early development of social cognition is influenced by experience, even when the human brain is highly immature," says psychological scientist Marcela Peña of Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, lead researcher on the study. "Our results are important for modeling early cognitive development."

Previous research on early cognitive development suggests that some cognitive functions develop only after the brain has matured sufficiently, while other cognitive functions develop in response to a rich social environment.

To disentangle the roles played by neural maturation and environmental exposure in relation to gaze following, Peña and colleagues decided to compare the gaze following abilities of preterm and full-term infants.

"Because preterm infants are exposed to face-to-face interactions earlier (in terms of postmenstrual age) than infants who are born at term, they may become sensitive to gaze direction sooner as well," the researchers explain.

A total of 81 healthy infants participated in the study and they were split into four groups: Full-term 4-month-olds, full-term 7-month-olds, preterm 7-month-olds, and preterm 10-month-olds.

The preterm infants were born 2.5 to 3 months early -- thus, full-term 4-month-olds and preterm 7-month-olds had an equivalent postmenstrual age of about 13 months, but the preterm 7-month-olds had an additional 2.5 to 3 months of visual experience as a result of having entered the world early.

While sitting in his or her mother's lap, the infants were presented with a sound and visual cue to grab their attention. As soon as they were looking at the screen, a video of a woman appeared and the woman made peek-a-boo like gestures. The woman then turned her head and directed her gaze toward one side of the screen; subsequently, a moving toy appeared on each side of the screen. Using an eyetracking system adapted for infants, the researchers were able to monitor which side of the screen infants looked to first. The researchers repeated this procedure with each infant 20 times.

The data showed that preterm 7-month-olds and preterm 10-month-olds behaved like full-term 7-month-olds, looking to the toy on the side of the screen indicated by the woman's gaze. Full-term 4-month-olds, on the other hand, tended to look randomly to either side.

This pattern of results held even when the woman indicated direction with only her eyes, while her head continued to face forward.

Together, these findings suggest that exposure to visual experience outside the womb may matter most for early gaze following.

"Combined with previous results on vision and language cognition, our results support the idea that the early steps of human cognition develops in an asynchronous way," says Peña. "Some systems are more or less sensitive to external stimulation, but others can be more influenced by biological maturation."

Study co-authors include Diana Arias of Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and Ghislaine Dehaene-Lambertz of Universite Paris-Sud.

This work was supported by Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico Grant 1110928 from La Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Chile.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Association for Psychological Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Pena, D. Arias, G. Dehaene-Lambertz. Gaze Following Is Accelerated in Healthy Preterm Infants. Psychological Science, 2014; DOI: 10.1177/0956797614544307

Cite This Page:

Association for Psychological Science. "Visual exposure predicts infants' ability to follow another's gaze." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140815192534.htm>.
Association for Psychological Science. (2014, August 15). Visual exposure predicts infants' ability to follow another's gaze. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 13, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140815192534.htm
Association for Psychological Science. "Visual exposure predicts infants' ability to follow another's gaze." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140815192534.htm (accessed September 13, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Magic Mushrooms' Could Help Smokers Quit

'Magic Mushrooms' Could Help Smokers Quit

Newsy (Sep. 11, 2014) — In a small study, researchers found that the majority of long-time smokers quit after taking psilocybin pills and undergoing therapy sessions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Fat Shaming' Might Actually Cause Weight Gain

'Fat Shaming' Might Actually Cause Weight Gain

Newsy (Sep. 11, 2014) — A study for University College London suggests obese people who are discriminated against gain more weight than those who are not. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Common Sleeping, Anxiety Pills Linked To Alzheimer's

Common Sleeping, Anxiety Pills Linked To Alzheimer's

Newsy (Sep. 10, 2014) — Researchers found commonly prescribed sleeping and anxiety pills such as Xanax and Valium could lead to an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Half Of America Is Single

Why Half Of America Is Single

Newsy (Sep. 10, 2014) — New data shows singles make up the majority of the adult U.S. population for the first time since the government began tracking the data in 1976. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins