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Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us

Date:
August 21, 2014
Source:
University of Sydney
Summary:
Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us -- they are more extroverted, agreeable and open -- attributes that make them successful in the demanding, fast-paced and often stressful environment of an emergency department, according to a new study.

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us -- they are more extroverted, agreeable and open -- attributes that make them successful in the demanding, fast-paced and often stressful environment of an emergency department, according to a new study by University of Sydney.

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"Emergency nurses are a special breed," says Belinda Kennedy from Sydney Nursing School, a 15 year critical care veteran who led the study.

"Despite numerous studies about personalities of nurses in general, there has been little research done on the personalities of nurses in clinical specialty areas.

"My years working as a critical care nurse has made me aware of the difficulty in retaining emergency nurses and I have observed apparent differences in personality among these specialty groups. This prompted me to undertake this research which is the first on this topic in more than 20 years.

"We found that emergency nurses demonstrated significantly higher levels of openness to experience, agreeableness, and extroversion personality domains compared to the normal population.

"Emergency departments (ED) are a highly stressful environment -- busy, noisy, and with high patient turnover. It is the entry point for approximately 40 per cent of all hospital admissions, and the frequency and type of presentations is unpredictable.

"Emergency nurses must have the capacity to care for the full spectrum of physical, psychological and social health problems within their community.

"They must also able to develop a rapport with individuals from all age groups and socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, in time-critical situations and often at a time when these individuals are at their most vulnerable.

"For these reasons, ED staff experience high levels of stress and emotional exhaustion, so it's understandable that it takes a certain personality type to function in this working environment.

"Our research findings have potential implications for workforce recruitment and retention in emergency nursing.

"With ever-increasing demands on emergency services it is necessary to consider how to enhance the recruitment and retention of emergency nurses in public hospitals. Assessment of personality and knowledge of its influence on specialty selection may assist in improving this.

"The retention of emergency nurses not only has potential economic advantages, but also a likely positive impact on patient care and outcomes, as well as improved morale among the nursing workforce."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Sydney. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Belinda Kennedy, Kate Curtis, Donna Waters. The personality of emergency nurses: Is it unique? Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.aenj.2014.07.002

Cite This Page:

University of Sydney. "Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821090657.htm>.
University of Sydney. (2014, August 21). Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821090657.htm
University of Sydney. "Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821090657.htm (accessed March 3, 2015).

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