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Physician turnover remains high as more physicians retire

Date:
August 21, 2014
Source:
American Medical Group Association (AMGA)
Summary:
Physician turnover continues at the highest rate since the first year data was collected in 2005 for the second year in a row. Medical groups reported an average turnover rate of 6.8 percent in 2013, unchanged from 2012, according to a retention survey.
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Physician turnover continues at the highest rate since the first year data was collected in 2005 for the second year in a row. Medical groups reported an average turnover rate of 6.8 percent in 2013, unchanged from 2012, according to the 9th annual Physician Retention Survey from the American Medical Group Association (AMGA) and Cejka Search. The survey also reported turnover of 9.4 percent among advanced practice clinicians (APCs), which includes physician assistants and nurse practitioners. This represents an 18 percent reduction in 2013 (in 2012 ACP turnover was 11.6 percent).

The 6.8 percent physician turnover rate in 2012 and 2013 was significantly higher than the lowest rate of 5.9 percent reported in 2009 at the depth of the recession, and exceeded 6.4 percent reported in 2005, the first year data was collected.

This increased turnover tracks with findings that retirement is accelerating. "Retirement" as the reason for separation jumped to 18 percent in 2013, the highest percentage ever reported (representing a 50 percent increase).

"The survey findings provide evidence that recruitment and retention continue to be major challenges for health systems," stated Donald W. Fisher, Ph.D., CAE, president and chief executive officer of AMGA. "To rise to these challenges, medical groups are demonstrating remarkable leadership by investing in new staffing and delivery models, building and nurturing their teams in a strategic way, and making accountable care work for their patients and their communities."

"Changing demographics and healthcare reform make efficient recruitment more important than ever for medical groups," stated John Gramer, president of Cejka Search. "Delivering data and insight helps pave the way for more innovative recruitment and retention solutions in a rapidly changing talent marketplace."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Medical Group Association (AMGA). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Medical Group Association (AMGA). "Physician turnover remains high as more physicians retire." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821115632.htm>.
American Medical Group Association (AMGA). (2014, August 21). Physician turnover remains high as more physicians retire. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821115632.htm
American Medical Group Association (AMGA). "Physician turnover remains high as more physicians retire." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821115632.htm (accessed May 23, 2015).

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