Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Five medical conditions that may contribute to sudden unexpected death in North Carolina

Date:
August 28, 2014
Source:
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Summary:
A new study finds the five highest comorbidities of sudden unexpected death in North Carolina are hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease, and cardiomyopathy.

Sudden unexpected death (SUD) results from a malfunction of the heart and causes a rapid loss of blood flow through the body, leading to death. It is a very rapid process and may have few or no known warning signs. The overall survival rate for out-of-hospital arrest is only 5-10%. SUD is responsible for upwards of 450,000 people in the United States each year, with North Carolina experiencing an average of 32 SUD-related deaths each day.

New research has identified five medical conditions that may contribute to SUD in North Carolina at a rate that is significant.

Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease, and cardiomyopathy were found to be the highest contributors in North Carolina SUD cases, according to the first published work from the SUDDEN (SUDden DEath in North Carolina) study at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine.

"I think we are at the start of a long, important process to understand SUD in North Carolina," said lead study author Eugene H. Chung, MD, associate professor of cardiology at the UNC School of Medicine. This work was performed in collaboration with the Wake County Emergency Management Services.

The study was published online on August 27 in the British cardiology journal, Open Heart. It was funded by individual donations from Cecil Sewell, Scott Custer, and Joe and Ann Lamb. Additional support was provided by the Heart & Vascular division of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

While previous studies of SUD have also discovered a higher occurrence of the same five comorbidities, these studies were performed on largely middle-class, Caucasian populations in the Northwestern United States.

From March 1-June 29, 2013, the SUDDEN study identified 105 presumed occurrences of SUD in Wake County, North Carolina. Wake County is the second largest county in North Carolina and has a diverse population that is racially and socioeconomically similar to that of the population of the United States.

Death certificates were reviewed for all study subjects and medical data was collected for 90.5% of the subjects.

The researchers discovered that 56.8% of the subjects had a clinical history of hypertension. This is significant because the national prevalence of hypertension across the United States is 28.6%.

Other medical conditions found at a high rate in the SUD subjects were dyslipidemia (30.5%), diabetes mellitus (27.4%), cardiomyopathy (24.2%), and coronary heart disease (22.1%).

"If we find that these diseases are continually found in SUD patients across North Carolina, then programs focusing on prevention will become even more important," said Dr. Chung.

Dr. Chung and his colleagues plan to extend the study to each of the 100 North Carolina counties. They hope to create a database that identifies high-risk populations and discovers meaningful predictors of SUD to aid in the treatment and longevity of high-risk patients.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. P. Nanavati, J. P. Mounsey, I. W. Pursell, R. J. Simpson, M. E. Lewis, N. D. Mehta, J. G. Williams, M. W. Bachman, J. B. Myers, E. H. Chung. Sudden Unexpected Death in North Carolina (SUDDEN): methodology review and screening results. Open Heart, 2014; 1 (1): e000150 DOI: 10.1136/openhrt-2014-000150

Cite This Page:

University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "Five medical conditions that may contribute to sudden unexpected death in North Carolina." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140828110117.htm>.
University of North Carolina School of Medicine. (2014, August 28). Five medical conditions that may contribute to sudden unexpected death in North Carolina. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140828110117.htm
University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "Five medical conditions that may contribute to sudden unexpected death in North Carolina." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140828110117.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins