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New name for symptoms associated with menopause

Date:
September 2, 2014
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Experts who reviewed the terminology associated with genitourinary tract symptoms related to menopause -- currently referred to as vulvovaginal atrophy -- have agreed that the term genitourinary syndrome of menopause is a medically more accurate, all-encompassing, and a more publicly acceptable term.
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Experts who reviewed the terminology associated with genitourinary tract symptoms related to menopause -- currently referred to as vulvovaginal atrophy -- have agreed that the term genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) is a medically more accurate, all-encompassing, and a more publicly acceptable term.

Their thoughts are published in a recent Journal of Sexual Medicine article.

Going forward, GSM will encompass a collection of symptoms and signs associated with a decrease in estrogen and other sex steroids and may include genital symptoms of dryness, burning, and irritation; sexual symptoms of lack of lubrication, discomfort or pain, and impaired function; and urinary symptoms of urgency, dysuria and recurrent urinary tract infections.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. David J. Portman, Margery L.S. Gass. Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause: New Terminology for Vulvovaginal Atrophy from the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health and The North American Menopause Society. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/jsm.12686

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "New name for symptoms associated with menopause." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140902114727.htm>.
Wiley. (2014, September 2). New name for symptoms associated with menopause. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140902114727.htm
Wiley. "New name for symptoms associated with menopause." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140902114727.htm (accessed May 27, 2015).

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