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Geology of the Himalaya

The Geology of the Himalaya is a record of the most dramatic and visible creations of modern plate tectonic forces.

The Himalayas, which stretch over 2400 km are the result of an ongoing orogeny, the result of a collision between two continental tectonic plates.

This immense mountain range was formed by huge tectonic forces and sculpted by unceasing denudation processes of weathering and erosion.

The Himalaya-Tibet region is virtually the water tower of Asia: it supplies freshwater for more than one-fifth of the world population, and it accounts for a quarter of the global sedimentatary budget.

Topographically, the belt has many superlatives: the highest rate of uplift (nearly 1 cm/year at Nanga Parbat), the highest relief (8848 m at Mt.

Everest Chomolangma), the source of some of the greatest rivers and the highest concentration of glaciers outside of the polar regions.

Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article "Geology of the Himalaya", which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.
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July 1, 2015

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