Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Remote Control Robot Breaks Rough Terrain Travel Record, Paves Path For Future Planetary Science Missions

Date:
August 6, 1997
Source:
National Aeronautics And Space Administration
Summary:
A hardy traveler named "Nomad" recently set a record by traveling farther than any remotely controlled robot has before over rough territory. The robot's four wheels logged more than 133 miles (215 kilometers) across Chile's rugged Atacama Desert from June 15 to July 31, during a field experiment designed to prepare for future missions to Antarctica, the Moon and Mars.

Douglas IsbellHeadquarters, Washington, DC(Phone: 202/358-1753)

John BluckAmes Research Center, Moffett Field, CA(Phone: 650/604-5026)

Anne WatzmanCarnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA(Phone: 412/268-3830)

A hardy traveler named "Nomad" recently set a record by traveling farther than any remotely controlled robot has before over rough territory. The robot's four wheels logged more than 133 miles (215 kilometers) across Chile's rugged Atacama Desert from June 15 to July 31, during a field experiment designed to prepare for future missions to Antarctica, the Moon and Mars.

Scientists from NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, and Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute in Pittsburgh performed experiments with Nomad for 45 days, conducting both technology demonstrations and scientific activities. Nomad often worked on its own to avoid obstacles and, in a clear foreshadowing of the future duties of similar robots, it recognized meteorites planted in the desert as a test and may even have found a fossil.

"The Atacama trek is a quantum leap for the planetary robotics culture, where the historical standard of travel has been yards, not miles," said principal investigator Dr. William L. "Red" Whittaker of Carnegie Mellon. "Although the 'straight-line' distance on a map was only about 13 miles, Nomad had to weave through very difficult terrain, and it made numerous sidetrips for science and to test the meteorite sensors. It is a pioneer laying a trail toward future planetary robots, who will be challenged for thousands of miles and years of operations, in bold missions like searching for signs of life."

The 1,600-pound robot, developed at Carnegie Mellon and funded by NASA, validated the use of color stereo video cameras with human-eye resolution for geology. A separate panospheric camera returned more than a million video panoramas from the Atacama, a cold, arid region located above 7,000 feet.

"During different phases of testing, we configured the robot to simulate wide-area exploration of the Moon, the search for past life on Mars and for the gathering of meteorite samples in the Antarctic," said Dave Lavery, telerobotics program manager at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. "Nomad met or exceeded all of our objectives for this project."

"We want to give planetary scientists experience using mobile robots, so that they can develop the skills necessary for performing remotely guided investigations," added Dr. David Wettergreen, Nomad project leader at Ames.

Nomad is about the size of a small car. To maneuver through rough terrain, the robot has four-wheel drive and four-wheel steering with a chassis that expands to improve stability and travel over various terrain conditions. Four aluminum wheels with cleats provide traction in soft sand. For this terrestrial experiment, power was supplied by a gasoline generator that enabled the robot to travel at speeds up to about one mile per hour.

"Nomad drove itself through about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of the 133 miles it traveled," said Dr. Mark Maimone, Nomad software and navigation lead at Carnegie Mellon. "Autonomous driving is critical for planetary exploration because the communications delay between Earth and planets can be many minutes. With autonomous driving, a robot can explore a much greater distance because it doesn't have to wait for a person to decide a safe route. The rover is able to see obstacles and recognize them on its own," he said.

Nomad's unique onboard panospheric camera provided live 360-degree, video-based still images of the robot's surroundings. "Experimentation with the panospheric camera validated the use of immersive imagery for remote driving," Maimone said.

The camera takes a 360-degree picture -- one frame per second -- and did so throughout the mission. The high-resolution video camera focuses up into a hemispheric mirror similar to a store security mirror. The video view includes all of the ground up to the horizon in the circle surrounding Nomad.

"The camera is a new technology, and it gave members of the public as well as scientists a new way to drive with peripheral, or side vision," he explained. "We sent the Nomad pictures to a theater at the Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh that has a 200-degree, semi-circular screen. Fifty people at a time pushed a button to vote on whether the robot should look to the left, center or right."

On June 25, NASA scientists were driving the robot remotely from their laboratory at Ames, more than 5,455 miles (8,780 kilometers) away, when the scientists in California found a rock that appeared to contain algae fossils.

Using the rover's cameras, scientists noticed a light-colored, three-inch diameter rock with a darker, intricately shaped marking in a rock outcrop in the Chilean desert. The rock was retrieved by Chilean scientists and was brought to Ames for scientific analysis.

"The rock is sedimentary and was formed in an ancient sea bed. However, the consensus is that this rock does not contain fossilized algae," said Dr. Nathalie Cabrol, the expedition's NASA science team leader. The science team was excited to learn that the outcrop was an undiscovered geologic deposit from the Jurassic Period.

"This experience is one of the most important of the science tests," Cabrol said. "I am not sure that we can get much closer to what may happen with the research of interesting rocks on Mars and the related search for life in the coming Mars exploration program. We are most likely to face this exact situation of selecting a rock because it looks interesting to us. Once in the lab, we were unable to tell conclusively if there had been life in the rock at one time or not."

"The first-level interpretation from the rover camera was close enough, fossil or not," she added. "The team was able to reconstruct the geology of the site, often matching or at least getting very close to the conclusions of the back-up field team."

The total cost of developing Nomad and conducting the desert trek is $1.6 million. The project is funded by NASA with in-kind support from corporate sponsors and educational foundations.

NASA and Carnegie Mellon are formulating plans to use Nomad to look for meteorites in Antarctica in 1998 and 1999.

Further information about the Atacama desert trek, images and data are available from the Ames Intelligent Mechanisms Group at URL:

http://img.arc.nasa.gov/Nomad

Carnegie Mellon's Robotic's Institute also has a website at URL:

http://www.ri.cmu.edu/atacama-trek

-end-


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Aeronautics And Space Administration. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "Remote Control Robot Breaks Rough Terrain Travel Record, Paves Path For Future Planetary Science Missions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 August 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970806054806.htm>.
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. (1997, August 6). Remote Control Robot Breaks Rough Terrain Travel Record, Paves Path For Future Planetary Science Missions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970806054806.htm
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "Remote Control Robot Breaks Rough Terrain Travel Record, Paves Path For Future Planetary Science Missions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970806054806.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Space & Time News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Astronomers Spot Largest, Brightest Solar Flare Ever

Astronomers Spot Largest, Brightest Solar Flare Ever

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — The initial blast from the record-setting explosion would have appeared more than 10,000 times more powerful than any flare ever recorded. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
French Apple Fans Discover the Apple Watch

French Apple Fans Discover the Apple Watch

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) — Apple fans in France discover the latest toy, the Apple Watch. The watch comes in two sizes and an array of interchangeable, fashionable wrist straps. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Water You Drink Might Be Older Than The Sun

The Water You Drink Might Be Older Than The Sun

Newsy (Sep. 27, 2014) — Researchers at the University of Michigan simulated the birth of planets and our sun to determine whether water in the solar system predates the sun. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Woman Cosmonaut in 17 Years Blasts Off for ISS

First Woman Cosmonaut in 17 Years Blasts Off for ISS

AFP (Sep. 26, 2014) — A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying an American astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts, including the first woman cosmonaut in 17 years, blasted off on schedule Friday. Duration: 00:35 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins