Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

University of Florida Study Reveals Loss In Sensory Perception May Not Be Linked To Aging

Date:
September 12, 1997
Source:
University of Florida
Summary:
Aging has little effect on smell, taste or touch. There is a belief that as you age, everything deteriorates. The truth is there is only a modest change in sensory functioning.

By Connie Daughtry GAINESVILLE, Fla.---A University of Florida researcher says you can pick out a lemon at any age -- at least if you smell it.

Related Articles


After six years of volunteers smelling lemons and some 40 other scents including natural gas and bubble gum, Dr. Marc Heft has determined that aging has little effect on smell, taste or touch.

"There is a belief that as you age, everything deteriorates. The truth is there is only a modest change in sensory functioning," said Heft, director of the Claude Pepper Center for Research on Oral Health in Aging at UF's College of Dentistry. "There are a number of older folks that can smell and taste just as well as many of the young."

Ruling out various factors, including disease and whether the participants were smokers, the researchers found less than 10 percent of the differences in sensory perceptions are age-related. Heft said the findings mean good news for older people, who are experiencing a higher quality of life and are living longer.

"In Florida alone there are more than a million people over the age of 75, and they are a fairly healthy, vivacious population," Heft said. "What's emerging is a more upbeat vision of aging." UF researchers recruited 180 healthy volunteers between the ages of 20 and 88 for the study. The researchers' goal was to look at normal changes in the senses of taste, touch and smell as a person ages. They also tested the volunteers' abilities to feel pain and tell differences in temperature.

The volunteers participated in five one-hour sessions to identify which stimuli they could perceive, their threshold level (the lowest amount of a stimulus a person could perceive and identify) and how well they perceived differences in sensations above their threshold level.

Using a probe about the size and shape of a pencil, the researchers asked the volunteers to identify various temperatures and pressures. The tests involved stimulating the area above the upper lip and the chin with the probe. "The face is a wonderful model to look at sensory perceptions because day to day we sample our environment through our nose, eyes and mouth," Heft said.

The researchers used a test known as the Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, in which participants scratched and sniffed cards with different scents on them ranging from licorice to paint thinner.

The researchers noted that women are better smellers than men.

"The women were able to identify the different scents better, but we don't know why that it is yet," Heft said. "There were no differences between gender regarding the other senses."

Heft said the body uses the senses in various ways, including protecting it from harm, and that may be why senses are stable throughout life. "The take-home message is, there are going to be a number of immutable factors that to some degree will play a part in your sensory perception. Disease and your inherited genetic makeup are two factors," he said.

"However, there are factors you can control to a degree, such as for your motor system, by the amount of exercise you get. Cognitive aging is affected by how you develop your mind through activities such as reading," Heft said. "A big factor also is the amount of sun exposure you receive, which affects the skin's aging and indirectly affects the skin's senses."

The UF research is funded by the National Institute of Dental Research.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Recent UF Health Science Center news releases also are available on the UF Health Science Center Communications home page. Point your browser to http://www.vpha.health.ufl.edu/hscc/index.html

For the UF Health Science Center topic/expert list, point your browser to http://www.health.ufl.edu/hscc/experts.html

Academic components of the UF Health Science Center include the colleges of Dentistry, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Veterinary Medicine. Clinical enterprises of the UF Health Science Center include Shands Hospital at UF, the UF Faculty Group Practice and a statewide network of UF-affiliated hospitals and clinics. Point your browser to http:// www.vpha.health.ufl.edu


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Florida. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Florida. "University of Florida Study Reveals Loss In Sensory Perception May Not Be Linked To Aging." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 September 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/09/970912133938.htm>.
University of Florida. (1997, September 12). University of Florida Study Reveals Loss In Sensory Perception May Not Be Linked To Aging. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/09/970912133938.htm
University of Florida. "University of Florida Study Reveals Loss In Sensory Perception May Not Be Linked To Aging." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/09/970912133938.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins