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Doula Support Lowers Caesarian Rates For Cases Of Induced Labor

Date:
May 4, 1998
Source:
University Of Maryland, Baltimore
Summary:
Women experiencing induced labor with the support of a doula -- a female companion experienced in labor and delivery -- during childbirth has a caesarian section delivery rate of 20 percent, while those without doula support had a 63 percent caesarian section delivery rate.
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Women experiencing induced labor with the support of a doula -- a female companion experienced in labor and delivery -- during childbirth has a caesarian section delivery rate of 20 percent, while those without doula support had a 63 percent caesarian section delivery rate. Researchers from Case Western Reserve University report on the latest of a series of studies designed to examine the effects of labor support by a doula. In six clinical trials, researchers have found that providing the support of a doula to women during childbirth decreased caesarian section delivery rates, shortened labor times, and reduced the need for analgesia. The study was presented at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in New Orleans, May 1-5. For interviews during the meeting, contact the press room at (504) 670-8502 or 670-8508.Researchers’ Institutional Contact: Sandra Henry (713) 500-3308


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University Of Maryland, Baltimore. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "Doula Support Lowers Caesarian Rates For Cases Of Induced Labor." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 May 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980429164254.htm>.
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. (1998, May 4). Doula Support Lowers Caesarian Rates For Cases Of Induced Labor. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980429164254.htm
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "Doula Support Lowers Caesarian Rates For Cases Of Induced Labor." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980429164254.htm (accessed July 29, 2015).

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