Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Heavy Drinkers Can Add Heavy Burden To Their Risk For Stroke

Date:
May 12, 1998
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Studies have shown moderate amounts of alcohol can be beneficial in reducing the risk of heart attack or stroke, but too much of a good thing can turn bad according to a report in this month's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

DALLAS, May 8 -- Studies have shown moderate amounts of alcohol can be beneficial in reducing the risk of heart attack or stroke, but too much of a good thing can turn bad according to a report in this month's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Related Articles


Italian and Austrian researchers examined the drinking habits of 826 men and women and found that those who drank the most -- more than four bottles of beer per day -- were most likely to develop fatty buildup in the vessels leading to the brain, setting the stage for stroke.

"Regular consumption of more than 100 grams of alcohol per day emerged as a prominent risk factor for early development of deposits that clog the arteries," says lead author Stefan Kiechl, M.D., of the department of neurology at the Innsbruck University Hospital in Innsbruck, Austria. "We found that it even surpassed the effects of heavy smoking (20 or more cigarettes per day) as a risk factor for stroke."

The researchers focused on the effects alcohol has upon early atherosclerosis -- which results when fatty deposits in the blood clump together to form plaques on the tissue lining of blood vessels. They found that alcohol consumption could be associated with the development, or inhibition, of early atherosclerosis.

Low alcohol intake -- defined as having 25 grams of alcohol per day, the equivalent of one bottle of beer -- cut in half the risk of developing blockages in the arteries that lead to the brain. Kiechl says previous research has shown alcohol has chemicals that help negate the formation of clots in the bloodstream. He admits it's possible this discovery may have been a chance finding, adding that further research is needed to prove that low alcohol intake can have such a dramatic effect.

Drinking less than once a week was shown to have no measurable effect on one's risk for developing atherosclerosis. Light drinkers faced a lower risk of atherosclerosis than did either heavy drinkers or abstainers. "The protection offered by alcohol consumption of 50 grams per day resulted because the alcohol can lessen the vessel injuries brought about by high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the 'bad' cholesterol," says Kiechl.

He says that no consistent evidence emerged to determine whether any of the beverages -- beer, white or red wine, spirits or liqueurs -- was superior in terms of reducing stroke risk. He adds that men and women did not differ in this response to alcohol in the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Heavy Drinkers Can Add Heavy Burden To Their Risk For Stroke." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 May 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/05/980512080319.htm>.
American Heart Association. (1998, May 12). Heavy Drinkers Can Add Heavy Burden To Their Risk For Stroke. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/05/980512080319.htm
American Heart Association. "Heavy Drinkers Can Add Heavy Burden To Their Risk For Stroke." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/05/980512080319.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

AP (Jan. 30, 2015) The NFL announced this week that the number of game concussions dropped by a quarter over last season. Still, the dangers of the sport still weigh on players, and parents&apos; minds. (Jan. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Shows Newborn Chicks Count From Left to Right Just Like Humans

Study Shows Newborn Chicks Count From Left to Right Just Like Humans

Buzz60 (Jan. 30, 2015) Researchers for the first time identified human&apos;s innate preference for associating low and high numbers with the left and right respectively in another species. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Best Mood Elevating, Feel Good Shakes & Smoothies

Best Mood Elevating, Feel Good Shakes & Smoothies

Buzz60 (Jan. 30, 2015) You can elevate your mood by having a meal in a glass. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) offers the best &apos;feel good&apos; smoothies and shakes chock full of depression-relieving ingredients...including apples, berries, lemons, cucumbers, papaya, kiwi, spinach, kale, whey protein, matcha, ginger, turmeric and cinnamon. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Poll Says Firstborn Is Responsible, Youngest Is Funnier

Poll Says Firstborn Is Responsible, Youngest Is Funnier

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) According to a poll out of the U.K., eldest siblings feel more responsible and successful than their younger siblings. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins