Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Kidney Donor Recovers Quickly After First-Of-Its-Kind Procedure

Date:
June 18, 1998
Source:
University Of Michigan
Summary:
Surgeons at the University of Michigan Medical Center have removed a kidney from a living organ donor in an unprecedented way. As a result, kidney donor Lynn Toornman of Toronto returned to normal activities, including driving, within a week of surgery---a recovery that commonly takes three to four weeks.

ANN ARBOR---Surgeons at the University of Michigan Medical Center have removed a kidney from a living organ donor in an unprecedented way.

As a result, kidney donor Lynn Toornman of Toronto returned to normal activities, including driving, within a week of surgery---a recovery that commonly takes three to four weeks. Toornman's kidney was transplanted into her mother, Suzanne Siddall, 65, of Battle Creek, Mich.

The technique used to remove the kidney is a variation on laparoscopy, a form of surgery in which the doctor operates through small incisions with specially designed instruments. For patients, laparoscopy is less invasive, leaves smaller scars, and reduces post-operative pain, pulmonary complications and recovery time. On the other hand, the technique is difficult to master and takes longer to perform than open surgery.

"I liken laparoscopy to operating with chopsticks," says Stuart Wolf, M.D., director of the in the U-M Surgery Department. "It's hard enough for a surgeon just to operate laparoscopically, but the tiny incisions mean we also can't use the greatest surgical instrument ever---the hand."

To remove Toornman's kidney, Wolf and colleagues at the U-M Medical Center used a modified form of laparoscopy in which an incision is made just large enough to accommodate a surgeon's hand (about 2 3/4 inches long). This approach, called "hand-assisted laparoscopy," is easier and quicker to perform than regular laparoscopic surgery but less invasive than open surgery.

The modification allows surgeons without advanced technical training to employ laparoscopic techniques and doctors experienced in laparoscopy to use it on more complicated procedures. "It opens the door for more patients to benefit from laparoscopy," Wolf says.

Surgeons at a few medical centers around the country use traditional laparoscopic techniques to excise kidneys from donors, then make an incision at the conclusion of the procedure to remove the organ. For hand-assisted laparoscopies, however, this incision is made first so the surgeon can use it during the operation. "Current results with standard laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (kidney removal) have been favorable, but the procedure is difficult to perform," Wolf says. "With the hand-assisted technique, more surgeons should be able to safely perform the procedure, so more donors will benefit from minimally invasive surgery."

A major concern for U-M surgeons was whether the quality of the donated kidney would suffer as a result of this novel technique, says Robert Merion, M.D., director of the U-M Transplant Center. Merion assisted Wolf in the laparoscopic kidney removal and also transplanted the organ in the recipient. "In this first pioneering case," he says, "the kidney looked beautiful and functioned perfectly immediately after it was transplanted. We would be hard pressed to make it go any smoother."

The Toornman-Siddall transplant, which was performed April 30, provides anecdotal evidence that hand-assisted laparoscopy is a medically viable alternative to open surgery in some cases. But how does it stack up against standard laparoscopy, in which no incision is made for the surgeon's helping hand?

Wolf and colleagues from the University of Wisconsin address that question in a paper published in the July issue of the Journal of Urology in which they compare hand-assisted and standard laparoscopy for cases---such as kidney cancer---in which it is less critical to extract the kidney in pristine condition.

The researchers concluded the hand-assisted technique was faster and reduced major complications. At the same time, the length of patients' hospital stays, recovery time, and post-operative pain increased only minimally. "The bottom line," Wolf says, "is that hand assistance appears to increase the speed and safety of laparoscopic nephrectomies without sacrificing the benefits of minimally invasive surgery."

Hand-assisted laparoscopy is made possible by a device called a Pneumo Sleeve, a modified surgical glove that allows surgeons to insert their hand through an incision while maintaining the airtight cavity needed to hold injected carbon dioxide that expands the work space and improves visualization.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Michigan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Michigan. "Kidney Donor Recovers Quickly After First-Of-Its-Kind Procedure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 June 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980618032257.htm>.
University Of Michigan. (1998, June 18). Kidney Donor Recovers Quickly After First-Of-Its-Kind Procedure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980618032257.htm
University Of Michigan. "Kidney Donor Recovers Quickly After First-Of-Its-Kind Procedure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980618032257.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A U.S. doctor has tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, as the worst-ever outbreak continues to grow. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins