Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cereal Lessens Colon Cancer Risk

Date:
August 25, 1998
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Processing wheat bran in cereals by a method called extrusion processing increased the bran's cancer-fighting potential, when compared to raw wheat bran and flaked cereals in a study with laboratory rats conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the University of California.

BOSTON, Mass.--Processing wheat bran in cereals by a method called extrusion processing increased the bran's cancer-fighting potential, when compared to raw wheat bran and flaked cereals in a study with laboratory rats conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the University of California. The findings were presented here today at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. Prior animal and human studies have demonstrated the value of wheat bran in the diet in reducing the risk of colon cancer.

The six-month study showed up to a 40 percent reduction in the number of aberrant crypt cells in the colons of laboratory rats fed a controlled diet of extrusion-processed wheat bran, according to principal investigators Wallace Yokoyama, Ph.D., of the USDA's Western Regional Research Center in Albany, Calif., and Paul Davis, Ph.D., Division of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, UC-Davis, who termed the reduction "significant."

Colon cancer is expected to kill more than 47,000 people in the U.S. this year and is the third leading cause of cancer death for men and women, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society.

Previous research has demonstrated that people with colon cancer have a higher number of aberrant crypt cells, found in the lining of the colon. Raw wheat bran is known to reduce the number of "crypts," says Yokoyama. However, he noted, since most people typically do not have raw wheat bran in their diet, "there was an interest in determining if cereals containing processed wheat bran performed as well as raw wheat bran." Not only did it perform as well, claims Yokoyama, "processing of wheat bran actually improves its health-promoting properties."

It's still unclear to researchers how the wheat bran, raw or processed, reduces the number of aberrant crypt cells, although it appears to involve microbial action, according to Yokoyama.

Most cereals, whether wheat bran or another type, undergo processing. Extrusion processing involves squeezing, stirring and applying high shear forces, causing changes to the wheat bran, which Yokoyama believes increases the colon's absorption of the bran's healthy properties. The other primary method of cereal processing is flake processing, a much gentler process that causes less change to the wheat bran.

The test results are applicable only to processed wheat bran in cereals. "You would not get the same results from processed wheat bran in bread, for example, because there is very little shear involved in that processing," says Yokoyama.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Cereal Lessens Colon Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 August 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980825080317.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (1998, August 25). Cereal Lessens Colon Cancer Risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980825080317.htm
American Chemical Society. "Cereal Lessens Colon Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980825080317.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Where's a body buried? Buster's nose can often tell you. He's a cadaver dog, specially trained to find human remains and increasingly being used by law enforcement and accepted in courts. These dogs are helping solve even decades-old mysteries. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins