Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Light In Liquids Can Be Regulated Electrically

Date:
June 16, 1999
Source:
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research
Summary:
Chemists from Utrecht University and Philips Research have been able to regulate the flow of light through a liquid by means of an electrical field. As part of a project funded by the NWO’s Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), they developed a liquid containing metal "nano-rods". A liquid of this type can be used in electrical sun screens, for example in a car window, with the light transmission being adjusted by means of a knob.

Chemists from Utrecht University and Philips Research have been able to regulate the flow of light through a liquid by means of an electrical field. As part of a project funded by the NWO’s Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), they developed a liquid containing metal "nano-rods". A liquid of this type can be used in electrical sun screens, for example in a car window, with the light transmission being adjusted by means of a knob.

Related Articles


The ability of the liquid to screen out the sun is based on the tiny metal rods it contains, which move at random in suspension. The rods have a diameter which can be altered from 12 to 22 nanometres and an adjustable length of between 40 and 730 nanometres. They absorb light of a certain colour, and the electrons resonate with the light over the length of the rod. The colour of the light absorbed depends on the length of the rods. If all the rods are oriented in the same direction, the liquid hardly absorbs any light at all.

The orientation of the rods can be adjusted by means of an electrical field which causes the transport of a charge in the rods. This means that the mid-point of the positive charge no longer coincides with that of the negative charge, so that the rods are subject to a force which causes them to orient themselves in the direction of the electrical field. The chemists found that the strength of the field required to orient the rods in an alternating field is dependent on their length.

The phenomenon of light absorption by nano-rods was already known in the 1930s. However, there had up to now been hardly any systematic research, because it proved to be a difficult matter to produce a liquid in which all the rods are of equal size and do not coagulate. To produce such a liquid, the Dutch chemists filled a finely perforated mould with gold. They then dissolved the membrane of the mould so that the rods remained behind on the base. These were then transferred to water by means of ultrasonic vibration. A special anticoagulant ensured that the gold rods did not form aggregates.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. "Light In Liquids Can Be Regulated Electrically." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990616063542.htm>.
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. (1999, June 16). Light In Liquids Can Be Regulated Electrically. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990616063542.htm
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. "Light In Liquids Can Be Regulated Electrically." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990616063542.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

3D Printed Instruments Make Sweet Music in Sweden

3D Printed Instruments Make Sweet Music in Sweden

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 23, 2014) Students from Lund University's Malmo Academy of Music are believed to be the world's first band to all use 3D printed instruments. The guitar, bass guitar, keyboard and drums were built by Olaf Diegel, professor of product development, who says 3D printing allows musicians to design an instrument to their exact specifications. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) As more and more Bluetooth-enabled devices are reaching consumers, developers are busy connecting them together as part of the Internet of Things. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins