Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Carbon Gives Armstrong Edge In Tour De France

Date:
July 23, 1999
Source:
American Institute Of Physics
Summary:
Medical science led Lance Armstrong in his fight against cancer. Now materials science is helping him take the lead in the Tour de France. For the world's most famous biking contest, Armstrong isn't testing his mettle with metal. He and other members of the U.S. team, are using a simple, yet powerful frame made of carbon.

July 22, 1999 -- Medical science led Lance Armstrong in his fight against cancer. Now materials science is helping him take the lead in the Tour de France.

For the world's most famous biking contest, Armstrong isn't testing his mettle with metal. He and other members of the U.S. team, are using a simple, yet powerful frame made of carbon.

Carbon is one of the lightest elements, making it an ideal material to use in the construction of lightweight bikes. Armstrong's bike frame is made up of tubes created using carbon fibers. The result is a bike that requires less energy to move. "If the frame has less mass, you can accelerate the bike with smaller forces," explains University of Virginia physics professor Louis Bloomfield.

Not only is the bike light, it's stiff. Carbon atoms in the fiber forge extremely tight "covalent" bonds with one another in the fiber, comparable to the tight bonds in a diamond, another form of pure carbon. A metal bike frame bends more easily, twisting in relation to the wheels, which forces the rider to adjust the steering more often than with a stiff frame.

But stiffness is a disadvantage when a rider has to go over bumps. No problem, say the folks at Trek Bicycle Corporation in Wisconsin who make the Model 5500 OCLV bike being used by the team. The "direction" of the stiffness can be controlled. The bike is resistant to the twisting forces, but flexible up-and-down. To do this, some of the fibers in the bottom tube are twisted in a barber-pole type pattern parallel to the length of the tube. "The ability to tune stiffness to this degree is not available in conventional materials," says Trek's Wes Wilcox.

Think carbon bikes are something only for the racing elite? Not so. You may not be ready for the Tour de France, but the bike is commercially available here in the US.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute Of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Institute Of Physics. "Carbon Gives Armstrong Edge In Tour De France." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 July 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/07/990723083406.htm>.
American Institute Of Physics. (1999, July 23). Carbon Gives Armstrong Edge In Tour De France. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/07/990723083406.htm
American Institute Of Physics. "Carbon Gives Armstrong Edge In Tour De France." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/07/990723083406.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Gulfstream G500, G600 Unveiling

Gulfstream G500, G600 Unveiling

Flying (Oct. 20, 2014) Watch Gulfstream's public launch of the G500 and G600 at their headquarters in Savannah, Ga., along with a surprise unveiling of the G500, which taxied up under its own power. Video provided by Flying
Powered by NewsLook.com
Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) Scientists in Tokyo have demonstrated what they say is the world's first 3D projection that floats in mid air. A laser that fires a pulse up to a thousand times a second superheats molecules in the air, creating a spark which can be guided to certain points in the air to shape what the human eye perceives as an image. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

3BL Media (Oct. 20, 2014) Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-fuel Impala Video provided by 3BL
Powered by NewsLook.com
What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) Microsoft will reportedly release a smartwatch that works across different mobile platforms, has a two-day battery life and tracks heart rate. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins