Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Findings May Affect Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer

Date:
January 13, 2000
Source:
University Of Toronto
Summary:
Researchers from Mount Sinai Hospital's Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and the University of Toronto have confirmed that there are two very different forms of colorectal cancer, a finding that could lead to changes in treatment for patients.

TORONTO - In a ground-breaking study to be published on January 13, 2000, in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Mount Sinai Hospital's Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and the University of Toronto have confirmed that there are two very different forms of colorectal cancer, a finding that could lead to changes in treatment for patients.

Related Articles


At the present time, all colorectal cancer patients are treated with a similar approach. It now appears that the disease has two forms that behave quiet differently.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in North America. An estimated 20,000 Canadians will be diagnosed with the disease this year.

The study establishes that 17 per cent of colorectal patients have a genetic abnormality in their cancer cells called microsatelite instability (MSI), while 83 per cent of patients have a different spectrum of genetic mutations that lead to chromosomal instability (CSI). The research team has determined that colorectal cancer patients with the MSI form of the disease have a better chance of surviving longer and their tumor is less likely to spread throughout the body.

"The study may ultimately lead to changes in the clinical management of colorectal cancer," says Dr. Steven Gallinger, Senior Scientist at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, general surgeon at Mount Sinai, and Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Toronto.

The MSH research team used data and tumor samples provided by the Ontario Cancer Registry and over 40 pathology departments in the province to study 650 young colorectal cancer patients treated in Central East part of Ontario between 1989 and 1993.

"The most important finding was a significant difference in survival time", explains Dr. Gallinger. "MSI positive cases survived much longer than other colorectal cancer patients."

"At the present time, we treat all colorectal cancer patients as if they have the same disease. This study provides the first evidence that the different genetic pathways that can lead to colon cancer result in tumors which look the same, but behave very differently," says Dr. Alan Bernstein, Director of the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and Professor of Medical Genetics and Microbiology, University of Toronto.

The other members of the research team are: Dr. Mark Redston, associate scientist, SLRI, assistant professor, pathologist, MSH, assistant professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Toronto; Dr. Robert Gryfe, surgical resident, University of Toronto; Dr. Shelley Bull, senior scientist, SLRI, associate professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, University of Toronto; Dr. Eric Holowaty, director, cancer surveillance unit, division of preventive oncology, Cancer Care Ontario; Melyssa Aronson, genetic councillor MSH, Dr. Eugene Hsieh, pathologist, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre; and Hyeja Kim, MSc, research technician, SLRI.

The study was funded by a research grant from the National Cancer Institute of Canada.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Toronto. "Study Findings May Affect Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 January 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000111122722.htm>.
University Of Toronto. (2000, January 13). Study Findings May Affect Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000111122722.htm
University Of Toronto. "Study Findings May Affect Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000111122722.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins