Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Celiac Disease Not As Uncommon As Once Thought, Say Researchers At Wake Forest

Date:
January 28, 2000
Source:
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Summary:
Celiac disease is common in the United States and often goes undiagnosed, according to a study published in the January edition of the Journal of Pediatrics by physicians at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the University of Maryland.

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Celiac disease is common in the United States and often goes undiagnosed, according to a study published in the January edition of the Journal of Pediatrics by physicians at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the University of Maryland.

Related Articles


Estimated to affect 1 in 150-200 people in Europe, celiac disease is a genetic disorder that results in a sensitivity to gluten from wheat, rye or barley products. If left untreated, celiac disease keeps the body from absorbing needed vitamins and minerals, often leaving a patient anemic and malnourished.

However, treatment is not painful, according to Ivor D. Hill, M.D., a pediatric gastroenterologist and expert on celiac disease at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

"By following a gluten-free diet, patients will experience no symptoms and lead healthy, normal lives," Hill said. "However, it is easier said than done in some cases. Patients have to diligently find ways to prepare foods without these products. It's a matter of knowing what is good for you and incorporating it into your diet."

Before this study, celiac disease was generally believed to be rare in the United States, according to Hill.

"Studies conducted by me and collaborating colleagues at the University of Maryland, confirm the condition is not rare in the United States and is as common as in Europe," he said.

Because of a lack of awareness of the many ways it can manifest, celiac disease has taken an average of 11 years to diagnose and patients who suffer from it are often first diagnosed with other conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and lactose intolerance. A diagnosis of celiac disease requires microscopic examination of a small piece of tissue from the intestinal lining (biopsy) obtained during an endoscopic procedure, according to Hill.

"Celiac disease can be extremely varied in presentation and physicians must have a high index of suspicion when trying to diagnosis it," Hill said. "Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of the few centers in the country conducting research on the disorder."

The disorder can be asymptomatic for many years, then a stressor can trigger the disease, causing the patient to experience symptoms including bouts of diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal pain when exposed to foods containing gluten.

A total of 1,200 individuals took part in this study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Celiac Disease Not As Uncommon As Once Thought, Say Researchers At Wake Forest." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 January 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000128071928.htm>.
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. (2000, January 28). Celiac Disease Not As Uncommon As Once Thought, Say Researchers At Wake Forest. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000128071928.htm
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Celiac Disease Not As Uncommon As Once Thought, Say Researchers At Wake Forest." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000128071928.htm (accessed January 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Poultry Culled in Taiwan to Thwart Bird Flu

Poultry Culled in Taiwan to Thwart Bird Flu

Reuters - News Video Online (Jan. 28, 2015) Taiwan culls over a million poultry in efforts to halt various strains of avian flu. Julie Noce reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Media Criticizing Parents For Not Vaccinating Children

Media Criticizing Parents For Not Vaccinating Children

Newsy (Jan. 28, 2015) As the Disneyland measles outbreak continues to spread, the media says parents who choose not to vaccinate their children are part of the cause. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shark Bite Victim Making Amazing Recovery

Shark Bite Victim Making Amazing Recovery

AP (Jan. 27, 2015) A Texas woman who lost more than five pounds of flesh to a shark in the Bahamas earlier this month could be released from a Florida hospital soon. Experts believe she was bitten by a bull shark while snorkeling. (Jan. 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shoveling Snow: How to Prevent Back Injuries

Shoveling Snow: How to Prevent Back Injuries

Washington Post (Jan. 26, 2015) What&apos;s the proper technique for shoveling snow? A physical therapist offers specific tips for protecting your back while you dig out this winter. Video provided by Washington Post
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins