Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Membrane Protein Research Yields New Insights Into Inner Workings Of The Cell

Date:
June 28, 2000
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
Biophysicists at the National Science Foundation’s National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida, have discovered that membrane proteins give rise to unique patterns of signals in their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. This result opens a new approach for the three dimensional characterization of membrane protein structures.

Biophysicists at the National Science Foundation’s National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida, have discovered that membrane proteins give rise to unique patterns of signals in their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. This result opens a new approach for the three dimensional characterization of membrane protein structures.

Membrane proteins are responsible for communication between the external cellular environment and the cell’s interior where chemistry and biological functions are typically accomplished. Membrane proteins are often responsible for cellular recognition and for the transport of nutrients into and products out of cells. However, these important proteins have been particularly difficult to characterize by standard technologies and hence few membrane protein structures are known today.

"About 25 percent of proteins are membrane proteins, yet structures of only few of these are known," says Kamal Shukla, director of NSF's molecular biophysics program, which funded the research. "X-ray crystallography and solution NMR cannot be used for these proteins because they are hard to crystallize and are not soluble. The methodology developed by Cross and his colleagues for obtaining structural information of integral membrane proteins is therefore exceedingly important."

It has been known for some time that structural constraints from solid state NMR spectroscopy of uniformly aligned samples can be used to develop a high resolution three-dimensional structure. However, while many constraints can be obtained there has been no approach for dependable resonance assignments. In other words, without knowing where in the molecule each signal comes from it has been difficult to make progress with structural characterization.

Now, researchers Tim Cross, Riqiang Fu and Jack Quine, and their coworkers, supported by the NSF’s molecular biophysics program, have discovered that the signal patterns observed in two dimensional spectra directly reflect the distribution of amino acids about a helical axis, known as a helical wheel. Through standard methods of isotopic labeling using bacterial cultures, it is now possible to assign these signals to specific atomic sites in the membrane protein helices.

Furthermore, the location of the resonance patterns in the spectrum defines the tilt of the helix within the membrane. Indeed, it is possible to get this topological information on a helix without signal assignments - the first time this has been possible in NMR spectroscopy.

These results have been published as the cover story in the May 2000 issue of the Journal of Magnetic Resonance.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Membrane Protein Research Yields New Insights Into Inner Workings Of The Cell." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 June 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/06/000625233208.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (2000, June 28). Membrane Protein Research Yields New Insights Into Inner Workings Of The Cell. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/06/000625233208.htm
National Science Foundation. "Membrane Protein Research Yields New Insights Into Inner Workings Of The Cell." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/06/000625233208.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Awesome New Camouflage Sheet Was Inspired By Octopus Skin

Awesome New Camouflage Sheet Was Inspired By Octopus Skin

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Scientists have developed a new device that mimics the way octopuses blend in with their surroundings to hide from dangerous predators. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Green Power Blooms as Japan Unveils 'hydrangea Solar Cell'

Green Power Blooms as Japan Unveils 'hydrangea Solar Cell'

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) A solar cell that resembles a flower is offering a new take on green energy in Japan, where one scientist is searching for renewables that look good. Duration: 01:29 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tiny Satellites, Like The One Tossed From ISS, On The Rise

Tiny Satellites, Like The One Tossed From ISS, On The Rise

Newsy (Aug. 18, 2014) The Chasqui I, hand-delivered into orbit by a Russian cosmonaut, is one of hundreds of small satellites set to go up in the next few years. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins