Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Making An Artificial Eye Move

Date:
August 15, 2000
Source:
University Of Alberta
Summary:
A team of researchers at the University of Alberta is making artificial eyes move, giving patients more confidence after radical facial surgery. A person with one eye missing may suffer psychologically and physically because of the loss. But the U of A team is trying to change that.

A team of researchers at the University of Alberta is making artificial eyes move, giving patients more confidence after radical facial surgery. A person with one eye missing may suffer psychologically and physically because of the loss. But the U of A team is trying to change that.

Related Articles


"The whole idea is to put some movements into eyes which are used as static prosthesis," said Dr. Gary Faulkner, from the Department of Mechanical Engineering. "If someone has cancer and had to have parts removed because of a tumour, there is nothing--no nerves, nothing--left. So we decided to use the good eye as a signal to drive the artificial one."

Researchers from mechanical and electrical engineering and rehabilitation medicine have joined forces to create a false eye that rotates in synchronicity with its "good partner," said Faulkner. He collaborated with Dr. Max Meng in electrical engineering, Jason Gu, a PhD candidate studying under Meng and Dr. Albert Cook, the dean of rehabilitation medicine.

The implant would serve patients with malignant facial tumours who have portions of the face, including an entire eye socket, removed. The team used the world's tiniest electrical motor--which is normally used on model airplanes-to develop an autonomous motor system. Using the good eye as a monitor and infrared detectors built into a pair of glasses, the team worked on a signal control to track movement-vertically and horizontally-by recording and storing the movement as sensed data space. The eye movement signal is then obtained through the sensor.

"The person would have to wear glasses and the little motor would be on the glasses," said Gu. "But it would be unobtrusive so people couldn't really notice the motor, or the whole idea would be senseless."

Researchers are now working on replacing the motor with alternative methods. But improving the lives of self-conscious patients who have become experts at avoiding eye contact for fear others will notice the static eye, would be rewarding, said Gu. The study is published in the current issue of Robotics and Autonomous Systems.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Alberta. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Alberta. "Making An Artificial Eye Move." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 August 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/08/000811064346.htm>.
University Of Alberta. (2000, August 15). Making An Artificial Eye Move. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/08/000811064346.htm
University Of Alberta. "Making An Artificial Eye Move." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/08/000811064346.htm (accessed March 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Washington Post (Mar. 30, 2015) — Denisa Livingston, a health advocate for the Dinι Community Advocacy Alliance, and the Post&apos;s Abby Phillip discuss efforts around the country to make unhealthy food choices hurt your wallet as much as your waistline. Video provided by Washington Post
Powered by NewsLook.com
UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 30, 2015) — The $12.8 billion merger will combine the U.S.&apos; third and fourth largest pharmacy benefit managers. Analysts say smaller PBMs could also merge. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) — Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins