Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Common Genetic Mutation Linked To Uterine Cancer

Date:
June 5, 2001
Source:
Ohio State University Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers have discovered nearly half of pre-menopausal women carry sub-microscopic pre-malignant lesions that may mark them at higher risk of developing uterine cancer later on in life.

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC) have discovered nearly half of pre-menopausal women carry sub-microscopic pre-malignant lesions that may mark them at higher risk of developing uterine cancer later on in life. These tiny lesions, linked to alterations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene, are detectable even in normal-appearing tissues, suggesting there may be a way to predict future risk of endometrial cancer even when no pre-cancers are visible. Apparently they arise naturally in a small number of endometrial cells during normal monthly regeneration.

Related Articles


"We know from earlier research that mutations or deletions in the PTEN gene can signal the earliest endometrial pre-cancers," said George Mutter, MD, of BWH. "Pathologists have always had difficulty agreeing upon diagnosis of these lesions because we lacked objective methodology. Now that we know that changes in the PTEN gene are linked to the earliest stages of endometrial cancer, and are present in so many young women, we can refocus our concept of what contributes to real cancer risk. Progression to cancer is an inefficient process that can take years. During this period most lesions disappear on their own, and those that enlarge acquire a distinctive microscopic appearance readily diagnosed by pathologists before they become a cancer. Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy, usually developing after menopause, and eventually affecting 2.5 per cent of American women.

In evaluating PTEN function, the researchers obtained 132 samples of uterine tissue and divided them into three diagnostic categories; normal (proliferative), persistent proliferative (slightly abnormal), or EIN (endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia , or clearly defined precancers). Utilizing laser capture microdissection and highly sensitive immunohistochemistry, they selected cells from each group and compared PTEN function across sample lines. Loss of PTEN function was apparent in 43, 56, and 63 per cent in proliferative, persistent proliferative, and EIN diagnostic categories respectively, with loss of PTEN function increasing with age.

"We were stunned to find the PTEN mutation in such a large number of young women whose tissues appeared perfectly normal under the microscope," added Charis Eng, MD, PhD, director of the Clinical Cancer Genetics Program at the OSUCCC. She adds, however, that only a small fraction of those women who have altered PTEN genes will actually develop cancer. "Loss of PTEN function is an important, but not sufficient step toward developing endometrial cancer."

"There are many other steps leading to endometrial cancer," says Eng, including such things as genetic change due to environmental factors, hormones, diet and lifestyle. "Now, we can link genetic factors with environmental factors. The beauty of our discovery is that it offers us a way to pursue a true molecular epidemiologic approach to cancer prevention."

Mutter says the findings should not change the way physicians are currently evaluating individual patients. "Diagnosis of pre-malignant disease should still be based upon routine histologic examination. The role of special PTEN studies in patient management has not yet been defined."

The findings appear in the June 1 edition of Cancer Research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio State University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ohio State University Medical Center. "Common Genetic Mutation Linked To Uterine Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 June 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010605073154.htm>.
Ohio State University Medical Center. (2001, June 5). Common Genetic Mutation Linked To Uterine Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010605073154.htm
Ohio State University Medical Center. "Common Genetic Mutation Linked To Uterine Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010605073154.htm (accessed October 26, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Newsy (Oct. 25, 2014) — A Harvard University Research Team created genetically engineered stem cells that are able to kill cancer cells, while leaving other cells unharmed. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins