Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Swallowing A Tiny Imaging Capsule Aids In Diagnosis Of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

Date:
October 22, 2002
Source:
American College Of Gastroenterology
Summary:
The use of a small wireless capsule video device to detect bleeding in the small intestine is safe, well-tolerated, and more accurate than another common diagnostic approach according to a study presented at the 67th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology.

SEATTLE (October 21, 2002) -- The use of a small wireless capsule video device to detect bleeding in the small intestine is safe, well-tolerated, and more accurate than another common diagnostic approach according to a study presented at the 67th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology.

Related Articles


"The investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is often difficult due to limitations of conventional endoscopic studies in the detection of disorders in the small intestine," said Ramona M. Lim, M.D., of the University of Miami School of Medicine/Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami, FL.

Patients with obscure GI bleeding experience bleeding of unknown origin that persists or recurs after a negative initial endoscopy (colonoscopy and/or upper GI endoscopy). For some of these patients the bleeding may be caused by lesions in the small intestine that would not be detected with colonoscopy or upper GI endoscopy.

In wireless capsule endoscopy, the patient swallows a tiny imaging capsule that incorporates a light source, video camera, battery, antenna, and radio transmitter. Images of the intestinal tract are transmitted twice each second by radio frequency to an array of sensors worn around the patient's abdomen and the signals are digitally recorded on a device that is later downloaded. The patient swallows the capsule in the morning and wears the recording device for 8 hours. The capsule is eliminated and discarded. A gastroenterologist reviews the images.

Dr. Lim and her colleagues studied 20 patients with GI bleeding from an unidentified source.

Researchers evaluated these patients using the wireless capsule technology, then followed up using a technique known as push enteroscopy. In push enteroscopy, a four-foot long tube outfitted with a small video camera is inserted down the esophagus, through the stomach and into the first third of the small intestine. The researchers found that wireless capsule endoscopy identified potential sources of bleeding in 70 percent of the patients, compared to 45 percent with push enteroscopy.

While the Miami study revealed that this technology is more sensitive than push enteroscopy in detecting problems in the small intestine, it is not without drawbacks. With wireless capsule endoscopy a gastroenterologist cannot biopsy or treat bleeding in the small intestine. The use of this technology is not appropriate for patients with bowel obstructions.

The ACG was formed in 1932 to advance the scientific study and medical treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The College promotes the highest standards in medical education and is guided by its commitment to meeting the needs of clinical gastroenterology practitioners. Consumers can get more information on GI diseases through the following ACG-sponsored programs:


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College Of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College Of Gastroenterology. "Swallowing A Tiny Imaging Capsule Aids In Diagnosis Of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 October 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/10/021022071519.htm>.
American College Of Gastroenterology. (2002, October 22). Swallowing A Tiny Imaging Capsule Aids In Diagnosis Of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/10/021022071519.htm
American College Of Gastroenterology. "Swallowing A Tiny Imaging Capsule Aids In Diagnosis Of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/10/021022071519.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins