Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Natural Anti-inflammatory Agent May Shield Brain From Stroke Damage

Date:
February 27, 2003
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Stroke patients with higher levels of a natural anti-inflammatory chemical called interleukin-10 (IL-10) in their blood suffer less brain damage after a stroke, according to a study published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. This finding may represent a new way to minimize stroke damage, stroke death and improve recovery.

DALLAS, Feb. 21 – Stroke patients with higher levels of a natural anti-inflammatory chemical called interleukin-10 (IL-10) in their blood suffer less brain damage after a stroke, according to a study published in today's rapid access issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. This finding may represent a new way to minimize stroke damage, stroke death and improve recovery.

Neurological symptoms worsen in about a third of stroke patients in the days after a stroke, says researcher Ángel Chamorro, M.D., of the Hospital Clínic, Clinical Institute of Nervous System Diseases, IDIBAPS, in Barcelona, Spain. This increases the risk of death and long-term disability. However, scientists know little about why.

In this study, researchers took blood samples from 231 ischemic stroke patients when they were admitted. Ischemic strokes are caused by a blood clot that blocks blood flow to the brain.

Researchers determined the blood levels of two natural anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-10 and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The average time from stroke onset to admission was 8.2 hours. Samples were collected within 12 hours in 80 percent of patients and within 6 hours in 50 percent. Researchers also collected samples from 43 patients admitted to the hospital without neurological disorders. These people served as controls.

The researchers found that patients with low levels of IL-10 in their blood during the first hours after stroke were three times more likely to have worsening neurological symptoms.

"This relationship was independent of other well-known predictors of clinical worsening such as clinical severity on admission, elevated glucose, early signs of tissue damage or high fever. Overall, this study reinforces the growing evidence that anti-inflammatory processes play a major role in human acute ischemia and suggests that IL-10 may have a potential role as a neuroprotectant in acute vascular syndromes," Chamorro says.

While IL-10 levels were associated with stroke progression, there was no link between stroke progression and the level of IL-4, he says.

IL-10 plasma concentrations of less than 6 picograms per milliliter (pg/mL) were independently associated with clinical worsening within 48 hours. Eighty-three patients or 35.9 percent experienced a worsening of neurological symptoms.

"IL-10 appears to be especially significant in patients with small-vessel disease," Chamorro says.

However, it's too soon to suggest that IL-10 levels be used as part of a standard clinical evaluation of stroke patients, he says. "For the time being, measuring these molecules must be restricted to research protocols and clinical studies. While findings observed in this study are very fruitful for hypothesis generation, clinical practice still must rely on classical tools, such as neuro-imaging data and neurological examination."

However, Chamorro adds that patients with very low levels of IL-10 may be good candidates for studies of experimental drugs designed to protect brain cells. By taking baseline measurements, it may be possible to "select high-risk candidates for clinical trials in which neuro-protection relies on inflammation-mediated damage."

Co-authors are Nicolás Vila, M.D.; José Castillo, M.D.; Antonio Dávalos, M.D., Ph.D.; Anna Esteve, Ph.D.; and Ana M. Planas.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Natural Anti-inflammatory Agent May Shield Brain From Stroke Damage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030226073913.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2003, February 27). Natural Anti-inflammatory Agent May Shield Brain From Stroke Damage. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030226073913.htm
American Heart Association. "Natural Anti-inflammatory Agent May Shield Brain From Stroke Damage." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030226073913.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — A recent report claims personality can change over time as we age, and usually that means becoming nicer and more emotionally stable. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How to Master Motherhood With the Best Work/Life Balance

How to Master Motherhood With the Best Work/Life Balance

TheStreet (Apr. 22, 2014) — In the U.S., there are more than 11 million couples trying to conceive at any given time. From helping celebrity moms like Bethanny Frankel to ordinary soon-to-be-moms, TV personality and parenting expert, Rosie Pope, gives you the inside scoop on mastering motherhood. London-born entrepreneur Pope is the creative force behind Rosie Pope Maternity and MomPrep. She explains why being an entrepreneur offers the best life balance for her and tips for all types of moms. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins