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Berkeley Lab Physicist Challenges Speed Of Gravity Claim

Date:
June 19, 2003
Source:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Summary:
Albert Einstein may have been right that gravity travels at the same speed as light but, contrary to a claim made earlier this year, the theory has not yet been proven. A scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) says the announcement by two scientists, widely reported this past January, about the speed of gravity was wrong.

Albert Einstein may have been right that gravity travels at the same speed as light but, contrary to a claim made earlier this year, the theory has not yet been proven. A scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) says the announcement by two scientists, widely reported this past January, about the speed of gravity was wrong.

Stuart Samuel, a participating scientist with the Theory Group of Berkeley Lab's Physics Division, in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, has demonstrated that an "ill-advised" assumption made in the earlier claim led to an unwarranted conclusion.

"Einstein may be correct about the speed of light but the experiment in question neither confirms nor refutes this," says Samuel. "In effect, the experiment was measuring effects associated with the propagation of light, not the speed of gravity."

According to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, light and gravity travel at the same speed, about 186,000 miles (300,000 kilometers) per second. Most scientists believe this is true but the assumption was that it could only be proven through the detection of gravity waves. Sergei Kopeikin, a University of Missouri physicist and Edward Fomalont, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), believed there was an alternative.

On September 8, 2002, the planet Jupiter passed almost directly in front of the radiowaves coming from a quasar, a star-like object in the center of a galaxy billions of light-years away. When this happened, Jupiter's gravity bent the quasar's radiowaves, causing a slight delay in their arrival on Earth. Kopeikin believed the length of time that the radiowaves would be delayed would depend upon the speed at which gravity propagates from Jupiter.

To measure the delay, Fomalont set up an interferometry system using the NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array, a group of ten 25-meter radio telescopes distributed across the continental United States, Hawaii, and the Virgin Islands, plus the 100-meter Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany. Kopeikin then took the data and calculated velocity-dependent effects. His calculations appeared to show that the speed at which gravity was being propagated from Jupiter matched the speed of light to within 20-percent. The scientists announced their findings in January at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

Samuel argues that Kopeikin erred when he based his calculations on Jupiter's position at the time the quasar's radiowaves reached Earth rather than the position of Jupiter when the radiowaves passed by that planet.

"The original idea behind the experiment was to use the effects of Jupiter's motion on quasar-signal time-delays to measure the propagation of gravity," he says. "If gravity acts instantly, then the gravitational force would be determined by the position of Jupiter at the time when the quasar's signal passed by the planet. If, on the other hand, the speed of gravity were finite, then the strength of gravity would be determined by the position of Jupiter at a slightly earlier time so as to allow for the propagation of gravitational effects."

Samuel was able to simplify the calculations of the velocity-dependent effects by shifting from a reference frame in which Jupiter is moving, as was used by Kopeikin, to a reference frame in which Jupiter is stationary and Earth is moving. When he did this, Samuel found a formula that differed from the one used by Kopeikin to analyze the data. Under this new formula, the velocity-dependent effects were considerably smaller. Even though Fomalont was able to measure a time delay of about 5 trillionths of a second this was not nearly sensitive enough to measure the actual gravitational influence of Jupiter.

"With the correct formula, the effects of the motion of Jupiter on the quasar-signal time-delay are at least 100 times and perhaps even a thousand times smaller than could have been measured by the array of radio telescopes that Fomalont used," Samuel says. "There's a reasonable chance that such measurements might one day be used to define the speed of gravity but they just aren't doable with our current technology."

Berkeley Lab is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory located in Berkeley, California. It conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California. Visit our Website at http://www.lbl.gov


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. "Berkeley Lab Physicist Challenges Speed Of Gravity Claim." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 June 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/06/030619075759.htm>.
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. (2003, June 19). Berkeley Lab Physicist Challenges Speed Of Gravity Claim. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/06/030619075759.htm
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. "Berkeley Lab Physicist Challenges Speed Of Gravity Claim." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/06/030619075759.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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