Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Passive Tobacco Smoke Increases Complications In Children With Sickle Cell Disease

Date:
December 18, 2003
Source:
University Of California, Davis - Medical Center
Summary:
Physicians and researchers at the UC Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center found that children with sickle cell disease who are exposed to tobacco smoke in the home have more complications from the disease than those who live in a smoke-free environment.

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- Physicians and researchers at the UC Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center found that children with sickle cell disease who are exposed to tobacco smoke in the home have more complications from the disease than those who live in a smoke-free environment. The study was published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

Related Articles


"Exposure to environmental or passive tobacco smoke increased the risk of sickle cell crisis by 90 percent, and was not influenced by other factors known to increase complications, such as age of the patient or type of sickle cell disease," said Daniel C. West, associate professor of pediatrics at UC Davis and lead author of the study. "Exposure to tobacco smoke has a tremendous impact on children with sickle cell disease. In fact, the study suggests that removing passive tobacco smoke from the home might not only reduce the suffering of children with sickle cell disease, but also reduce the cost of medical care."

Sickle cell disease is a hereditary disease that affects hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries and delivers oxygen to tissues. The presence of sickle hemoglobin can lead to damaged and misshapen red blood cells that do not flow normally through blood vessels and deliver less than the normal amount of oxygen to peripheral tissues. These abnormalities can cause episodes of severe pain, known as sickle cell crises, and life-threatening damage to vital organs, such as the lungs and the brain.

Over a period of two years, researchers monitored 52 patients between the ages of 2 and 18 with several types of sickle cell disease.

Each patient or family completed an environmental survey and researchers recorded the number of sickle cell crises -- vaso-occlusive pain episodes, acute chest syndrome, stroke -- that required hospitalization.

The 22 children and adolescents who were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke experienced more than twice the number of sickle cell crises requiring hospitalization compared to those not exposed to tobacco smoke in the home.

As a secondary outcome, researchers found that the cost of hospitalization in the exposed group was more than triple the cost of hospitalization in the unexposed group.

West said, "If we can reduce smoking in family members, we may be able to significantly reduce the life-threatening complications of sickle cell disease in their children."

The UC Davis Sickle Cell Center is the only center located in inland Northern California. It serves a population of approximately 5 million people.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. "Passive Tobacco Smoke Increases Complications In Children With Sickle Cell Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 December 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031217071811.htm>.
University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. (2003, December 18). Passive Tobacco Smoke Increases Complications In Children With Sickle Cell Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031217071811.htm
University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. "Passive Tobacco Smoke Increases Complications In Children With Sickle Cell Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031217071811.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) A whole virus Ebola vaccine has been shown to protect monkeys exposed to the virus. Here&apos;s what&apos;s different about this vaccine. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Reuters - US Online Video (Mar. 26, 2015) Governor Mike Pence declares the recent HIV outbreak in rural Indiana a "public health emergency" and authorizes a short-term needle-exchange program. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins