Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Microwaves Could Bring Concealed Weapons To Light

Date:
March 4, 2004
Source:
Engineering And Physical Science Research Council
Summary:
Microwaves could provide a safe new way of finding hidden weapons and buried mines, thanks to UK research. Scientists are developing a microwave-based technique that can generate high-quality images of hidden objects.

Microwaves could provide a safe new way of finding hidden weapons and buried mines, thanks to UK research. Scientists are developing a microwave-based technique that can generate high-quality images of hidden objects. The research may lead to the use of microwaves as a safer alternative to X-rays in airport security checks, building searches, landmine detection and other applications.

This leading-edge work is being carried out by a team of engineers and physicists at Northumbria University, with funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Detection systems used in the fight against terrorism and other crimes rely on X-ray radiation to penetrate materials and build up an image of what is underneath. However, because X-rays can damage living tissue, considerable precautions need to be taken when using these systems. Microwave radiation, on the other hand, is harmless to humans and has the potential to produce 3-dimensional holographic images of objects concealed from view.

Although technically viable, microwave imaging systems will only see widespread deployment if they can produce results quickly and cheaply. To tackle this key barrier, the innovative technique being developed by the new EPSRC-funded project will comprise a two-stage process. The first involves the use of conventional detectors to measure the 2-dimensional pattern made by the scattering of microwaves when they come into contact with a hidden object. The second stage takes this data and uses computer software to construct a 3-dimensional image from it. The technique aims to avoid the need to use complex "one-stage" equipment that produces images slowly and at considerable expense.

Dr. David Smith, from the University's School of Engineering and Technology, is leading the project. He says: "The technology could be very versatile and suited to use in security, medical and industrial applications. Although we are just at the beginning of this research, our ultimate aim is to offer an alternative, fast 3D microwave imaging technique which can be used across a wide range of disciplines".

###

The research initiative, "A Novel Microwave Holographic Technique for 3D Imaging Applications", will last 23 months and receive EPSRC funding of more than 89,000.

To explore the medical potential of microwave imaging, the Wellcome Trust has awarded the research team a grant of 125,000.

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) is the UK's main agency for funding research in engineering and the physical sciences. EPSRC invests more than 500 million a year in research and postgraduate training to help the nation handle the next generation of technological change. The areas covered range from information technology to structural engineering, and from mathematics to materials science. This research forms the basis for future economic development in the UK and improvements in everyone's health, lifestyle and culture. EPSRC also actively promotes public awareness of science and engineering. EPSRC works alongside other Research Councils with responsibility for other areas of research. The Research Councils work collectively on issues of common concern via Research Councils UK. Website address for more information on EPSRC: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Engineering And Physical Science Research Council. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Engineering And Physical Science Research Council. "Microwaves Could Bring Concealed Weapons To Light." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040304074552.htm>.
Engineering And Physical Science Research Council. (2004, March 4). Microwaves Could Bring Concealed Weapons To Light. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040304074552.htm
Engineering And Physical Science Research Council. "Microwaves Could Bring Concealed Weapons To Light." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040304074552.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

AP (July 30, 2014) British officials said on Wednesday that driverless cars will be tested on roads in as many as three cities in a trial program set to begin in January. Officials said the tests will last up to three years. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

AP (July 30, 2014) A ruptured 93-year-old water main left the UCLA campus awash in 8 million gallons of water in the middle of California's worst drought in decades. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

AP (July 30, 2014) Smartphone powered paper airplane that was popular on crowdfunding website KickStarter makes its debut at Wisconsin airshow (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.K. To Allow Driverless Cars On Public Roads

U.K. To Allow Driverless Cars On Public Roads

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Driverless cars could soon become a staple on U.K. city streets, as they're set to be introduced to a few cities in 2015. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins