Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Insulin Decreases Inflammation, Aids Clot-Busting Drugs In Heart Attack Patients, UB Study Shows

Date:
March 8, 2004
Source:
University At Buffalo
Summary:
Incorporating insulin into the mix of clot-busting and anticoagulation drugs administered to a patient suffering a heart attack significantly lowers the amount of inflammation in the blood vessels following the attack, a response that can improve a patient's chances of survival, a study conducted by researchers from the University at Buffalo has shown.

Incorporating insulin into the mix of clot-busting and anticoagulation drugs administered to a patient suffering a heart attack significantly lowers the amount of inflammation in the blood vessels following the attack, a response that can improve a patient's chances of survival, a study conducted by researchers from the University at Buffalo has shown.

Related Articles


The study is the first to show that insulin can reduce concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA), two critical markers of inflammation, by 40 percent and 50 percent, respectively, during the 48 hours following a heart attack.

Concentrations of three additional inflammatory factors also were significantly lower in patients who received insulin compared to those who did not.

Results of the study will appear in the Feb. 24 issue of Circulation.

"This study shows for the first time that a low dose of insulin infused into patients with heart attacks may reduce damage to their heart by 50 percent," said Paresh Dandona, M.D., Ph.D., UB professor of medicine and senior author on the study. "This study will lead to further similar investigations on the use of insulin for heart attacks, stroke and acute coronary syndromes."

In earlier studies with obese patients, Dandona's research group showed that insulin exerts a significant anti-inflammatory effect on blood vessel walls, and their findings linked insulin with mechanisms that reduce clotting factors. Those findings suggested that insulin might help prevent clotting and promote dissolution of clots in persons with heart attack and stroke.

The current findings prove that hypothesis to be correct, Dandona said. The study involved 32 patients who came to the emergency department of Kaleida Health's Millard Fillmore Hospital in Buffalo suffering from a heart attack. Patients were assigned alternately to an insulin group or control group.

All patients received the clot-busting drug reteplase, plus any other prescribed medications, intravenously. The intervention group also received an infusion solution of insulin, glucose (to maintain normal glucose levels) and potassium following the reteplase administration, while the control group received a standard saline solution. Insulin was infused at a low dose continuously over 48 hours.

Analysis of blood samples collected at baseline and at several points during the 48 hours showed that concentrations of both inflammatory markers CRP and SAA rose significantly during the treatment period, a normal response to tissue injury caused by a heart attack. CRP has been shown to increase the amount of heart tissue damaged by a heart attack, and elevations of both CRP and SAA are associated with adverse outcomes in heart-attack patients, Dandona noted.

In patients who received insulin, both CRP and SAA increased significantly less. Insulin also appeared to stem the increase of a factor called plasminogen activator inhibitor, or PAI-1, which has been shown to hinder the ability of clot-busting drugs to open blocked vessels.

In addition, creatinine kinase, a protein contained in the heart muscle that is released during a heart attack, was reduced by 60 percent in the group infused with insulin, an indication that insulin protects the heart muscle during a heart attack, Dandona said.

"Infusing insulin at low doses along with antithrombotic agents reduces the amount of increase in inflammation and rapidly suppresses the increase of factors than interfere with clot-dissolving medication," said Dandona. "We think that these effects, along with insulin's known capacity to dilate blood vessels and prevent platelet clumping, could improve blood flow during a heart attack and help limit the damage to heart tissue."

He said further research is needed to determine the precise action of insulin responsible for its effect on the destructive inflammatory agents.

Also contributing to the research were Ajay Chaudhuri, M.B.B.S, M.R.C.P.; David Janicke, M.D., Ph.D.; Michael Wilson, M.D.; Devjit Tripathy, M.D.; Rejech Garg, M.D.; Arindi Bandyopadhyay, M.D.; Janeen Calieri; Debbie Hoffmeyer; Tufail Syed, M.B.B.S.; Husam Ghanim, and Ahmad Aljada, Ph.D., all from the UB Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.

The research was supported in part by an educational grant from Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals.

The University at Buffalo is a premier research-intensive public university, the largest and most comprehensive campus in the State University of New York. UB's more than 27,000 students pursue their academic interests through more than 300 undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University At Buffalo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University At Buffalo. "Insulin Decreases Inflammation, Aids Clot-Busting Drugs In Heart Attack Patients, UB Study Shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 March 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308073707.htm>.
University At Buffalo. (2004, March 8). Insulin Decreases Inflammation, Aids Clot-Busting Drugs In Heart Attack Patients, UB Study Shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308073707.htm
University At Buffalo. "Insulin Decreases Inflammation, Aids Clot-Busting Drugs In Heart Attack Patients, UB Study Shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308073707.htm (accessed March 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 31, 2015) — The Solitair device aims to take the confusion out of how much sunlight we should expose our skin to. Small enough to be worn as a tie or hair clip, it monitors the user&apos;s sun exposure by taking into account their skin pigment, location and schedule. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Washington Post (Mar. 30, 2015) — Denisa Livingston, a health advocate for the Dinι Community Advocacy Alliance, and the Post&apos;s Abby Phillip discuss efforts around the country to make unhealthy food choices hurt your wallet as much as your waistline. Video provided by Washington Post
Powered by NewsLook.com
UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 30, 2015) — The $12.8 billion merger will combine the U.S.&apos; third and fourth largest pharmacy benefit managers. Analysts say smaller PBMs could also merge. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) — Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins