Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Drug May Help Fight Some Lung Cancers

Date:
March 19, 2004
Source:
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Summary:
Northwestern Memorial Hospital is the only Chicago area hospital currently enrolling participants in a research study to find out if the drug Tarceva, also know as erlotinib, may help fight bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma (BAC), a type of non-small cell lung cancer generally considered resistant to chemotherapy.

Northwestern Memorial Hospital is the only Chicago area hospital currently enrolling participants in a research study to find out if the drug Tarceva, also know as erlotinib, may help fight bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma (BAC), a type of non-small cell lung cancer generally considered resistant to chemotherapy.

Related Articles


Tarceva is one of a new class of cancer drugs, know as EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) inhibitors, which seek to stop the spread of cancer cells by blocking the actions of the EGFR necessary for cancer cell growth. EGFR is found on the surface of many tumor cells and may be involved in the growth and virulence of those cells. Like its predecessor, Iressa, it is an example of a new generation of so-called "smart" drugs that specifically target cancer cells.

"This is an exciting study because for the first time we have a bona fide molecular target in our fight against lung cancer, in particular BAC," says lead investigator Jyoti Patel, M.D., an oncologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and an instructor of medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University. NMH's cancer program is affiliated with the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. "We hope Tarceva will cause the tumor to stop growing or shrink. Ultimately, we hope to manage lung cancer like a chronic disease with therapies such as this."

Patients with BAC generally live longer than those with more common non-small cell lung cancers, but BAC tumors are often multifocal and not appropriate for surgery. Many oncologists feel that BACs are less responsive to existing chemotherapeutic agents.

About 3 percent of all lung cancer patients have pure BAC tumors, and about 20 percent of all non-small cell lung cancers possess some BAC features. "BAC was once thought to be an uncommon form of lung cancer, but it appears to be increasing in incidence and more recent studies suggest that it may actually play a role in about one in five of cases of lung cancer," says Dr. Patel.

Unlike most lung cancers, BAC occurs more frequently in women than in men, and more frequently in nonsmokers than in smokers. One third of patients with BAC never smoked in comparison to about 10 percent of other lung cancers.

Previous studies have shown that about a quarter of BAC study participants respond to Tarceva after one month or more of study treatment; and the drug appears to be more effective in participants who had never smoked. Because BAC is less strongly associated with tobacco smoke than other lung cancers, these tumors may be associated with fewer molecular abnormalities and may provide a better 'target' for EGFR specific therapy.

"We'll be watching the never-smokers in our study to see if this holds up. Tobacco-related genetic changes in participants who smoke or have smoked may make them more resistant to this drug," said Dr. Patel.

Northwestern Memorial is enrolling participants with unresectable BAC who have had no or one prior chemotherapy regimen. For more information on the research study, please call Northwestern Memorial Hospital's physician referral department at 312-926-8400 or 1-877-926-4664.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "New Drug May Help Fight Some Lung Cancers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 March 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040319072716.htm>.
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. (2004, March 19). New Drug May Help Fight Some Lung Cancers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040319072716.htm
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "New Drug May Help Fight Some Lung Cancers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040319072716.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) Conflicting studies published in the same week re-ignited the debate over whether we should be eating breakfast. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) The family of a Dallas nurse infected with Ebola in the US says doctors can no longer detect the virus in her. Despite the mounting death toll in West Africa, there are survivors there too. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins