Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Biosensor-regulated Gene Therapy Reduces Heart Attack Damage In Mice

Date:
April 7, 2004
Source:
University Of South Florida Health Sciences Center
Summary:
A novel gene therapy that responds specifically to oxygen-starved heart muscle may protect against further injury following a heart attack, a study by University of South Florida cardiovascular researchers found. Their findings are reported in the April 2004 issue of the journal Hypertension.

Tampa, FL (April 6, 2004) -- A novel gene therapy that responds specifically to oxygen-starved heart muscle may protect against further injury following a heart attack, a study by University of South Florida cardiovascular researchers found. Their findings are reported in the April 2004 issue of the journal Hypertension.

Related Articles


M. Ian Phillips, PhD, DSc, and his team at the USF College of Medicine and All Children's Hospital Research Institute designed a kind of oxygen-sensitive biosensor that turns on protective genes when signs of oxygen deprivation indicate a heart attack and turns the genes off once blood flow restores adequate oxygen levels to the heart. Dr. Phillips, principal investigator; Yao Liang Tang, MD, lead author; and colleagues showed that this biosensor-regulated gene therapy protected heart muscle cells in mice with heart attacks from further injury.

Dr. Phillips and Dr. Tang envision administering such a therapy after a first heart attack to limit initial damage and prevent future attacks. While much work remains to test and refine such a therapy, Dr. Phillips said, this new concept might eventually be an alternative to stents and bypass surgery.

People who suffer one heart attack are at higher risk for subsequent attacks. Often lack of blood flow to the heart muscle, known as cardiac ischemia, does not cause pain or other symptoms. This asymptomatic or "silent" ischemia can lead to a second or third heart attack without prior warning.

"Repeated bouts of myocardial ischemia cause cumulative tissue damage in the heart vessels that can lead to a fatal heart attack," said Dr. Phillips, USF vice president for research and professor of physiology and biophysics. "Therefore, what patients need is a gene therapy strategy that acts in the heart and switches on or off, so that the therapeutic protein is produced only where and when it is needed."

"One of the exciting aspects of the approach, described by Tang et al, is the ability to directly link expression of potentially therapeutic genes to a pathological stimulus associated with myocardial infarction, ischemia," states an editorial in Hypertension highlighting the USF research. "Ultimately, this area of research will pave the way for development of 'smart' therapies for the heart that allow for early and rapid treatment of a wide variety of cardiac ailments."

The USF researchers designed a molecule -- which they call a "vigilant vector" -- containing both a means to increase the expression of protective heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) genes and the oxygen-sensitive switch that turns these genes on and off. They injected this molecule directly into the hearts of mice one hour after the mice had heart attacks.

Ten days following their heart attacks, the mice that received the biosensor-regulated gene therapy showed less heart tissue scarring and better recovery of heart pumping function than the untreated mice injected with saline only. The researchers demonstrated that turning on the protective HO-1 genes stopped the heart muscle cells from dying and limited the area of damage.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of South Florida Health Sciences Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of South Florida Health Sciences Center. "Biosensor-regulated Gene Therapy Reduces Heart Attack Damage In Mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 April 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/04/040407084149.htm>.
University Of South Florida Health Sciences Center. (2004, April 7). Biosensor-regulated Gene Therapy Reduces Heart Attack Damage In Mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/04/040407084149.htm
University Of South Florida Health Sciences Center. "Biosensor-regulated Gene Therapy Reduces Heart Attack Damage In Mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/04/040407084149.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins