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Study Detects Protein In Human Milk Linked To Reduced Risk Of Obesity

Date:
May 3, 2004
Source:
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have conducted the first study to detect the presence of a protein in human milk that may explain the association between breastfeeding and reduced risk of obesity later in life.

SAN FRANCISCO -- Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have conducted the first study to detect the presence of a protein in human milk that may explain the association between breastfeeding and reduced risk of obesity later in life.

The protein is adiponectin, which is secreted by fat cells and affects how the body processes sugars and lipids -- fatty substances in the blood. It's been suggested that adiponectin is involved in the metabolic syndrome, which includes insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease and occurs in 20-25 percent of adults. Higher levels of adiponectin have been associated with less disease.

If adiponectin is present in human milk, the Cincinnati Children's researchers theorized, the protein could have an influence over the metabolic "programming" of infants. That is, it could affect adiposity, or "fatness," later in life.

The Cincinnati Children's researchers analyzed samples of human milk collected from anonymous donor mothers as part of the Research Human Milk Bank at Cincinnati Children's and found levels of adiponectin that were "quite high – higher than many proteins found in human milk," says Lisa Martin, PhD, the study's lead author.

"This study is an important first step in developing molecular research focused on understanding the relationship between human milk constituents and later metabolism. Exposures early in life, during the period of extreme growth and development, may have an impact on adult disease."

The researchers also confirmed the presence of leptin in human milk. Leptin is another protein produced by fat that appears to play an important role in the regulation of body fat. Leptin is a satiety hormone, involved in the state of being "full."

Adiponectin levels, however, are substantially greater than leptin in human milk, according to Dr. Martin, a researcher in the Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Cincinnati Children's and in the division of Human Genetics. "Whether the greater quantity of adiponectin has biological significance remains to be seen," she says.

The study will be presented May 2 at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in San Francisco.

###Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is a 423-bed institution devoted to bringing the world the joy of healthier kids. Cincinnati Children's is dedicated to transforming the way health care is delivered by providing care that is timely, efficient, effective, patient-centered, equitable and safe. It ranks third nationally among all pediatric centers in research grants from the National Institutes of Health. The Cincinnati Children's vision is to be the leader in improving child health. Additional information can be found at http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "Study Detects Protein In Human Milk Linked To Reduced Risk Of Obesity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 May 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040503054446.htm>.
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2004, May 3). Study Detects Protein In Human Milk Linked To Reduced Risk Of Obesity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040503054446.htm
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "Study Detects Protein In Human Milk Linked To Reduced Risk Of Obesity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040503054446.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

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