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High Blood Testosterone Levels Associated With Increased Prostate Cancer Risk

Date:
May 10, 2004
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
Men over 50 years of age with high blood levels of testosterone have an increased risk of prostate cancer, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging. The finding throws some doubt on the safety of testosterone replacement therapy, the investigators say.
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Men over 50 years of age with high blood levels of testosterone have an increased risk of prostate cancer, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging. The finding throws some doubt on the safety of testosterone replacement therapy, the investigators say.

The researchers measured several forms of testosterone in almost 3,000 blood samples collected over a 40-year period from 759 men in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study on Aging, of whom 111 were diagnosed with prostate cancer. One form of testosterone, called free testosterone, which is biologically active and can actually be used by the prostate, was found to be associated with increased prostate cancer risk, according to J. Kellogg Parsons, M.D., instructor of urology at the Brady Urological Institute at Johns Hopkins and lead researcher of the study.

"Since testosterone replacement therapy increases the amount of free testosterone in the blood, older men considering or receiving testosterone replacement should be counseled as to the association until data from long-term clinical trials becomes available," says Parsons.

The association between free testosterone and prostate cancer risk in older men was not affected by height, weight, percent of body fat, or muscle mass. Total testosterone levels and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), another androgenic hormone, were also unrelated to prostate cancer risk, while the protein that binds testosterone in blood, called sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), was associated with a slightly decreased risk for prostate cancer.

Higher serum free testosterone is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer: results from the Baltimore longitudinal study on aging. J. Kellogg Parsons, H. Ballentine Carter, Patricia Landis, E. James Wright, Elizabeth Platz, E. Jeffrey Metter.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "High Blood Testosterone Levels Associated With Increased Prostate Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 May 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040510012315.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2004, May 10). High Blood Testosterone Levels Associated With Increased Prostate Cancer Risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040510012315.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "High Blood Testosterone Levels Associated With Increased Prostate Cancer Risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040510012315.htm (accessed September 4, 2015).

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