Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Minimally Invasive Treatment For Varicose And Spider Veins

Date:
June 8, 2004
Source:
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Summary:
More than 80 million Americans suffer from some form of superficial venous disease, such as varicose and spider veins. Doctors at Northwestern Memorial Hospital are now offering these patients a relatively new treatment option called Endovenous Laser Treatment (EVLT), which is an alternative to surgical stripping (removal) of the greater saphenous vein – the main vein that runs the length of the inner leg.

More than 80 million Americans suffer from some form of superficial venous disease, such as varicose and spider veins. Doctors at Northwestern Memorial Hospital are now offering these patients a relatively new treatment option called Endovenous Laser Treatment (EVLT), which is an alternative to surgical stripping (removal) of the greater saphenous vein – the main vein that runs the length of the inner leg.

During EVLT, a small laser fiber is inserted, usually through a needle stick in the skin, directly into the damaged vein. Continuous laser beams are then delivered inside the vein, which causes the vein to collapse and seal shut.

"This minimally invasive procedure offers many advantages to traditional methods of eliminating varicose veins. It is faster, less painful and leaves no scars," said Howard Chrisman, M.D., clinical vice chairman of radiologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Whereas surgical stripping is usually performed under general anesthesia, EVLT requires only local anesthesia and no hospitalization. In fact, the procedure typically takes only about thirty minutes and patients can return to their normal activities the same day." At Northwestern Memorial, the departments of dermatology, interventional radiology and vascular surgery coalesce to form a Vein Program that offers a unique multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of superficial venous disease. These unsightly veins are actually caused by an incompetent saphenous vein. Valves in the vein become weak and allow the blood to flow back and pool. The damaged vein lets the blood flow fall toward the feet rather than carrying it back to the heart. Then vessels of the vein, which are close to the skin, begin to branch out, become enlarged, and appear twisted and ropelike.

"While some people seek treatment for cosmetic improvement, many men and women seek relief from pain caused by discomfort and swelling in the legs," adds David Wrone, M.D., a dermatologist and co-director of the Vein Program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

Pain and swelling in the legs is frequently related to abnormal leg veins. Symptoms, often made worse by prolonged standing, include feelings of fatigue, heaviness, aching, burning, throbbing, itching, cramping, and restlessness of the legs. Severe varicose veins can compromise the nutrition of the skin and lead to eczema, inflammation or even ulceration of the lower leg.

Heredity is the number one contributing factor causing varicose and spider veins. Women are more likely to suffer from abnormal leg veins. Other predisposing factors include aging, standing occupations, obesity and leg injury.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Minimally Invasive Treatment For Varicose And Spider Veins." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 June 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040604025607.htm>.
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. (2004, June 8). Minimally Invasive Treatment For Varicose And Spider Veins. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040604025607.htm
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Minimally Invasive Treatment For Varicose And Spider Veins." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040604025607.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins