Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Northwestern Memorial Hospital Testing New Procedure For Patients With Major Depression

Date:
November 18, 2004
Source:
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Summary:
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a non-invasive technique that uses repeated short bursts of magnetic energy to stimulate nerve cells in the brain, is now being tested at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine as a potential treatment for participants with major depression.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a non-invasive technique that uses repeated short bursts of magnetic energy to stimulate nerve cells in the brain, is now being tested at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine as a potential treatment for participants with major depression. Northwestern will be one of 16 centers participating in the nationwide clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of TMS on participants who have not responded to antidepressant medications during efforts to manage their depression.

"Through this trial we hope to prove the effectiveness of TMS as a treatment alternative for major depression," said Dr. William Gilmer, psychiatrist at Northwestern Memorial, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and principal investigator for the Northwestern site. "We hope this treatment can provide another option to patients who haven't found success with many of the antidepressant medications currently available."

TMS produces about the same amount of magnetic energy as a standard MRI machine and works by sending pulses of magnetic energy aimed specifically at a portion of the brain called the left prefrontal cortex, which is thought to be involved with mood regulation.

The nature of magnetic fields allows the special pulses of energy to easily pass through the skull and into the brain. Once inside the brain, the magnetic pulses produce an electric field, which is thought to cause positive changes in mood. Participants remain fully awake during the 45 minute outpatient procedure and can resume their normal daily activities after the procedure. A TMS procedure is in no way similar to an electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) procedure - which requires a patient to receive anesthesia.

"The objective of TMS is to stimulate the "mood circuits" without causing a seizure. The stimulation applied to the brain is very focused, thereby reducing the risk of adverse effects, especially in comparison to ECT" Gilmer said.

This trial will involve an inactive (or sham) procedure to confirm if the antidepressant effect of TMS is real and durable and to identify participants who may improve simply because of the added attention they get in a research study, the so-called placebo effect. Neither the doctor nor participant will know which treatment - the active TMS or the sham - is being given since the sham device looks, acts and sounds like the real thing.

Smaller preliminary studies have encouraged researchers that TMS may produce an antidepressant effect. This larger and more rigorous trial will compare the effects of TMS on mood as compared to placebo and the information will be provided to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to support regulatory clearance of the Neuronetics TMS System for clinical use in the treatment of major depression. If TMS is cleared by the FDA, it would be the first available non-drug procedure for depression since the introduction of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was first used in the 1930's.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is already in use for brain mapping studies, diagnosis of neurological diseases and for research into a number of neurological and psychiatric conditions.

The Northwestern research study will be open to participants who are 18 to 70 years old, have been diagnosed with major depression as defined by the DSM-IV and have demonstrated resistance to antidepressant medications. Individuals who fit the criteria and are interested in participating can call Northwestern Memorial Hospital's physician referral department at 312/926-8400.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Northwestern Memorial Hospital Testing New Procedure For Patients With Major Depression." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 November 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041117001844.htm>.
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. (2004, November 18). Northwestern Memorial Hospital Testing New Procedure For Patients With Major Depression. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041117001844.htm
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Northwestern Memorial Hospital Testing New Procedure For Patients With Major Depression." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041117001844.htm (accessed September 3, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

AP (Sep. 2, 2014) As a third American missionary is confirmed to have contracted Ebola in Liberia, doctors on the ground in West Africa fear they're losing the battle against the outbreak. (Sept. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) When Facebook acquired the virtual reality hardware developer Oculus VR in March for $2 billion, CEO Mark Zuckerberg hailed the firm's technology as "a new communication platform." Duration: 02:24 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins