Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NASA Nanotechnology To Improve Microelectronics

Date:
December 17, 2004
Source:
NASA Ames Research Center
Summary:
NASA Ames Research Center, located in California's Silicon Valley, and Nanoconduction, Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif., are launching a new partnership to advance scientific and commercial utilization of NASA's innovative nanotechnology research by developing better cooling systems for microelectronics.

Carbon nanotubes.
Credit: Image courtesy of NASA Ames Research Center

NASA Ames Research Center, located in California's Silicon Valley, and Nanoconduction, Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif., are launching a new partnership to advance scientific and commercial utilization of NASA's innovative nanotechnology research by developing better cooling systems for microelectronics.

Nanotechnology is the ability to control or manipulate matter on the atomic scale, making it possible to create structures, devices and systems that have novel properties and functions because of their small size, approximately 1/10,000th the diameter of a human hair. Carbon nanotubes are extremely efficient at the transfer of heat, and are especially useful because of their small size, light weight, and mechanical strength.

"Reliable thermal protection for spacecraft and advanced instrument electronics is essential if NASA is to enable the nation's Vision for Space Exploration," said NASA Ames Center Director G. Scott Hubbard. "Our goal is to provide nanotechnology-based products to NASA as quickly as possible, in order to benefit missions in the near-term, as well as the longer term. Nanoscience has the potential to help NASA rapidly develop state-of-the-art systems in terms of performance, size, and weight," Hubbard concluded.

Nanoconduction has licensed the NASA Ames-developed Nano Engineered Thermal Material that is based on carbon nanotube array composites. The company will use its expertise to collaborate with NASA scientists to develop improved thermal management systems. The new partnership will enhance NASA Ames' existing expertise in creating, handling, processing and building systems composed of carbon nanotubes. As a result of this partnership, Nanoconduction expects to introduce advanced chip cooling technology for consumer products as early as 2007.

"Overheating impacts both the electronics industry and NASA's missions," said Bala Padmakumar, president of Nanoconduction, Inc. "With better heat protection, electronics will be more efficient, have higher performance, and can be more tightly packaged, reducing the overall size of the devices."

"Nanotechnology will enable the building of lightweight, high-strength composites and novel sensors for future-generation spacecraft," said Harry Partridge, chief of the NASA Ames' Nanotechnology Branch.

During the collaborative research, NASA will be able to explore applications of 'cool' microelectronics for use in a space environment. Designing systems with higher thermal conductivity will help increase their reliability and lifespan, while reducing their noise level. Improved thermal management systems could benefit future spacecraft by providing more efficient packing of electronics, leading to smaller, lighter payloads.

"This mutually beneficial collaboration will accelerate nanotechnology development for our own exploration initiative, while allowing our private sector partners to pursue commercially viable products," said Lisa Lockyer, chief of the NASA Ames Technology Partnerships Division.

For more information about NASA nanotechnology research, visit:

http://www.ipt.arc.nasa.gov

and

http://technology.arc.nasa.gov/nano


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA Ames Research Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA Ames Research Center. "NASA Nanotechnology To Improve Microelectronics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 December 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041217100357.htm>.
NASA Ames Research Center. (2004, December 17). NASA Nanotechnology To Improve Microelectronics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041217100357.htm
NASA Ames Research Center. "NASA Nanotechnology To Improve Microelectronics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041217100357.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) If you've ever watched "Back to the Future Part II" and wanted to get your hands on a hoverboard, well, you might soon be in luck. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) Researchers in South Korea are developing a robotic pilot that could potentially replace humans in the cockpit. Unlike drones and autopilot programs which are configured for specific aircraft, the robots' humanoid design will allow it to fly any type of plane with no additional sensors. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) British scientists have developed a prototype graphene paint that can make coatings which are resistant to liquids, gases, and chemicals. The team says the paint could have a variety of uses, from stopping ships rusting to keeping food fresher for longer. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Massive Air Bag Recall Affects More Than 4.5 Million Vehicles

Massive Air Bag Recall Affects More Than 4.5 Million Vehicles

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) Major automakers are recalling millions of vehicles due to potentially defective front passenger air bag inflators that can rupture and spray metal shrapnel. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins