Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

UT Southwestern Researchers Locate Gene Family Involved In Determining Potential For Acquiring Lupus

Date:
January 3, 2005
Source:
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas
Summary:
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have found a gene family involved in determining the potential for acquiring lupus, a debilitating autoimmune disease that affects more than one million Americans.

Dr. Ward Wakeland, director of the Center for Immunology, and his colleagues have found a gene family involved in determining the potential for acquiring lupus. From the Center for Immunology are (from left) Dr. Amy Wandstrat, assistant instructor; Dr. Wakeland; Charles Nguyen, Medical Scientist Training Program student; and Nisha Limaye, student research assistant.
Credit: Photo courtesy of University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas

DALLAS - Dec. 15, 2004 - Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have found a gene family involved in determining the potential for acquiring lupus, a debilitating autoimmune disease that affects more than one million Americans.

Related Articles


"Our findings indicate genetic susceptibility to lupus results from imbalance between genes that increase and genes that suppress the immune system's responsiveness," said Dr. Ward Wakeland, director of the Center for Immunology and the Harold C. Simmons Arthritis Research Center at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study in today's issue of Immunity. "Individuals with increased risk for lupus may simply have the misfortune of expressing a 'bad' combination of versions of genes that are 'good' for resistance to infectious diseases."

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease causing the immune system to attack the body's own tissue and organs, including the joints, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood and skin. The Lupus Foundation of America estimates approximately 1.5 million Americans have the disease, which affects all age groups. It is 10 to 15 times more likely in adult women than adult men.

In its study of a mouse strain that develops autoimmunity similar to human SLE, Dr. Wakeland's research team identified a cluster of genes, the SLAM/CD2 family, occurring in the same region of the human genome associated with genetic susceptibility to the disease. The genes played a crucial role in the disease's development in the mice, but only when they were expressed in specific combinations with other genes.

"The SLAM/CD2 family interacts with sets of highly variable genes, which can provide a pathway toward disease," said Dr. Wakeland.

In addition, the researchers linked this gene family to resistance to infectious diseases. The latest findings follow an earlier discovery by Dr. Wakeland and his colleagues of four genes that can halt lupus. These "suppressor" genes - Sles1, Sles2, Sles3 and Sles4 - can block the disease even if the susceptibility gene family is active.

"For example, Sles1 specifically suppresses the autoimmune activity associated with the SLAM/CD2 gene family found in the mouse model," Dr. Wakeland said. "With the identification of SLAM/CD2, we now have half of the combination of genes that can either lead to or suppress severe disease. Once we fully characterize Sles1, we'll have the complete picture."

Researchers in the Center for Immunology are currently working with faculty in the Division of Rheumatology and the Simmons Arthritis Research Center to expand analysis of these genes and their functions into humans with SLE, as well as individuals who may be at increased risk for developing the disease so they can be identified earlier.

"The way the disease is treated now is through a broad spectrum of drug therapies that basically suppress the entire immune system," Dr. Wakeland said. "Patients with lupus under this therapy are at risk to develop infectious diseases because their immune system is completely impaired. If we can understand what the suppressor gene is doing to block SLAM/CD2, we may be able to tweak the immune system back into normal balance."

Other Center for Immunology contributors to the Immunity study were Dr. Amy Wandstrat, assistant instructor; Xiang-Hong Tian, senior research associate; Charles Nguyen, Medical Scientist Training Program student; Alice Chan, MSTP student; Nisha Limaye, student research assistant; Srividya Subramanian, student research assistant; and Dr. Young-Sun Yim, former postdoctoral researcher. Dr. Harold Garner, professor of biochemistry, and Dr. Alexander Pertsemlidis, assistant professor in the Eugene McDermott Center for Growth and Development at UT Southwestern and Dr. Laurence Morel of the University of Florida School of Medicine also contributed.

Research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Alliance for Lupus Research, the Lupus Research Institute, the Arthritis Foundation and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "UT Southwestern Researchers Locate Gene Family Involved In Determining Potential For Acquiring Lupus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219192615.htm>.
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. (2005, January 3). UT Southwestern Researchers Locate Gene Family Involved In Determining Potential For Acquiring Lupus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219192615.htm
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "UT Southwestern Researchers Locate Gene Family Involved In Determining Potential For Acquiring Lupus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219192615.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins