Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Two Atypical Anti-psychotic Drugs May Be Associated With An Increased Risk Of Diabetes For Patients With Schizophrenia

Date:
January 5, 2005
Source:
Journal Of The American Medical Association
Summary:
Patients treated with the atypical anti-psychotic agents clozapine and olanzapine may be at an increased risk for insulin resistance, which is a major risk factor for diabetes mellitus, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

CHICAGO -- Patients treated with the atypical anti-psychotic agents clozapine and olanzapine may be at an increased risk for insulin resistance, which is a major risk factor for diabetes mellitus, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Related Articles


"Compared with the general population, life expectancy in patients with schizophrenia is shorter by as much as 20 percent, attributable to higher rates of suicide, accidental deaths, and natural causes such as cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, and endocrine disorders," according to background information in the article. "Recently, the newer 'atypical' antipsychotic agents have been linked to several forms of morbidity, including obesity; hyperlipidemia; type 2 diabetes mellitus; and diabetic ketoacidosis [a severe complication of diabetes]."

David C. Henderson, M.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues, evaluated 36 non-obese outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were treated with clozapine, olanzapine, or another medication, risperidone. Participants were given a diet to follow to maintain body weight and were told to fast for 12 hours prior to undergoing a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test.

"Both nonobese clozapine- and olanzapine-treated groups displayed significant insulin resistance and impairment of glucose effectiveness compared with risperidone-treated subjects," the researchers found.

In conclusion, the authors write: "Psychiatrists and primary care professionals should be aware that patients treated with clozapine and olanzapine may be at increased risk for insulin resistance, even if not obese. Insulin resistance is associated with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease and over time may increase the risk for diabetes mellitus in vulnerable individuals. Patients treated with these agents should be routinely screened, counseled to reduce risk, and provided early interventions."

(Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005;62:19–28. Available post-embargo at archgenpsychiatry.com)

Editor's Note: This study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health General Clinical Research Center, Bethesda, Md.; a Young Investigator Award from the National Alliance for Research of Schizophrenia and Depression, Great Neck, N.Y. (Dr. Henderson); and an Investigator-Initiated Independent Research Grant from Janssen Pharmaceutica, Beerse, Belgium.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal Of The American Medical Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal Of The American Medical Association. "Two Atypical Anti-psychotic Drugs May Be Associated With An Increased Risk Of Diabetes For Patients With Schizophrenia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050104113836.htm>.
Journal Of The American Medical Association. (2005, January 5). Two Atypical Anti-psychotic Drugs May Be Associated With An Increased Risk Of Diabetes For Patients With Schizophrenia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050104113836.htm
Journal Of The American Medical Association. "Two Atypical Anti-psychotic Drugs May Be Associated With An Increased Risk Of Diabetes For Patients With Schizophrenia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050104113836.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Reuters - US Online Video (Mar. 26, 2015) Governor Mike Pence declares the recent HIV outbreak in rural Indiana a "public health emergency" and authorizes a short-term needle-exchange program. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) While distracted driving is not a new problem for teens, new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says it&apos;s much more serious than previously thought. (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins