Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Outlook Is Bleak For The Smallest Premature Babies: 80 Percent Have Impairment

Date:
January 6, 2005
Source:
March Of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation
Summary:
Death or severe cognitive and neuromotor impairment are common outcomes among extremely premature infants (fewer than 26 weeks' gestation), according to a British study published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., JAN. 6, 2005 -- Death or severe cognitive and neuromotor impairment are common outcomes among extremely premature infants (fewer than 26 weeks' gestation), according to a British study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Related Articles


"Prematurity is a common, serious problem in America and unfortunately, the number of preterm births is rising each year," said Scott D. Berns, M.D., M.P.H., FAAP, vice president for chapter programs of the March of Dimes. "Too many babies are born extremely premature in this country, and the result is that many of them die in the hospital or suffer lifelong consequences, including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, chronic lung disease, blindness and hearing loss."

"More research on the underlying causes of preterm birth is needed if we are to reverse this trend," Dr. Berns said. "The March of Dimes wants to prevent prematurity from occurring in the first place -- we want every birth to be a healthy one."

This British study is the largest to date of babies born at 22 to 25 weeks of gestation with followup to early school age. Among the findings is that 41 percent of the extremely premature group have severe or moderate mental impairment at six years of age, compared to only 2 percent of a comparison group of classmates born full term. Only 20 percent of the children born extremely premature have no neuromotor or mental disability.

In 2003, the March of Dimes launched a five-year, $75 million Prematurity Campaign that includes more funding for medical research, services and education for women and their providers, and help and hope for families in crisis. It includes March of Dimes NICU Family SupportSM, a national project that provides comfort and information to families with a newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Families who have experienced or are experiencing a preterm birth are invited to visit marchofdimes.com/share, an online community for families to share their stories.

###

"Neurologic and Developmental Disability at Six Years of Age After Extremely Preterm Birth," by Neil Marlow, D.M., of the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, and colleagues, appears in NEJM, volume 352, number 1, January 6, 2005. An accompanying editorial, "Extreme Prematurity -- The Continuing Dilemma," by Betty R. Vohr, M.D., and Marilee Allen, M.D., appears in the same issue.

The March of Dimes is a national voluntary health agency whose mission is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects and infant mortality. Founded in 1938, the March of Dimes funds programs of research, community services, education, and advocacy to save babies. For more information, visit the March of Dimes Web site at http://marchofdimes.com or its Spanish Web site at http://nacersano.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by March Of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

March Of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. "Outlook Is Bleak For The Smallest Premature Babies: 80 Percent Have Impairment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106113615.htm>.
March Of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. (2005, January 6). Outlook Is Bleak For The Smallest Premature Babies: 80 Percent Have Impairment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106113615.htm
March Of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. "Outlook Is Bleak For The Smallest Premature Babies: 80 Percent Have Impairment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050106113615.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) Much of the Disneyland measles outbreak is being blamed on the anti-vaccination movement. The CDC encourages just about everyone get immunized. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) Public health officials are rushing to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened 70 people across 6 states and Mexico. The AP&apos;s Raquel Maria Dillon has more. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
This Is What It's Like To Date A Med Student

This Is What It's Like To Date A Med Student

BuzzFeed (Jan. 23, 2015) Dating is now speed-dating... or studying. Video provided by BuzzFeed
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins