Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Laser Warning And Reporting System For Pilots

Date:
January 15, 2005
Source:
U.S. Department Of Transportation
Summary:
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta announced new measures designed to alert and better prepare pilots to handle incidents of lasers being shined at their aircraft and to speed notification about such crimes to law enforcement investigators. The measures are designed to respond to a recent increase in the number of reported laser incidents.

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK (January 12, 2005) -- U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta today announced new measures designed to alert and better prepare pilots to handle incidents of lasers being shined at their aircraft and to speed notification about such crimes to law enforcement investigators. The measures are designed to respond to a recent increase in the number of reported laser incidents.

“Shining these lasers at an airplane is not a harmless prank. It is stupid and dangerous,” said Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta. “You are putting other people at risk, and law enforcement authorities are going to seek you out, and if they catch you, they are going to prosecute you.”

The measures, which are outlined in an Advisory Circular from the Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), recommends that pilots immediately report any unauthorized laser events to air traffic controllers. As soon as personnel with the FAA get these reports, they will notify appropriate law enforcement and security agencies through the Domestic Events Network. The changes will provide police with more timely and detailed information to help them identify and prosecute those who are shining lasers at planes.

The new measures also include requirements that air traffic controllers immediately notify pilots about the laser events. If pilots have a laser pointed at them, the circular strongly advises pilots and air crew to avoid direct eye contact given the health and safety risks posed by some types of lasers.

The Department also will be working with the Food and Drug Administration, the Consumer Product Safety Commission and others to improve product labeling and better educate the public.

“We are treating lasers in the cockpit as a serious aviation safety matter,” the Secretary said. “We must act now before someone’s reckless actions lead to a terrible and tragic incident.”

The Secretary announced the new measures today because of a recent spike in the number of incidents of laser being shined at airplanes. Since December 23, there have been 31 reported lasers incidents involving aircraft, seven in the past weekend alone. Since 1990 there have been over 400 similar incidents.

The Secretary noted that there are no indications that the people shining lasers at planes are anything other than careless individuals who are using commercially available lasers in a manner that is reckless and illegal. “There is no specific or credible intelligence that would indicate that these laser incidents are connected to terrorists.”

FAA research has shown that laser illuminations can temporarily disorient or disable a pilot during critical stages of flight such as landing or take-off, and in some cases, may cause permanent damage. However, given the relatively small number of incidents, there is no need to require new equipment for aircraft and aircrew at this time, the Secretary said.

The Secretary announced the new measures today during a simulator demonstration of the dangers posed to pilots from shining lasers into cockpits. The demonstration was held at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center in Oklahoma City, OK, where the FAA conducts research on a range of aviation-related health and safety issues. The FAA will continue to conduct research to determine if there are technological solutions for enhancing air crew safety during laser events, the Secretary added.

A copy of the FAA’s advisory circular is available at http://www.faa.gov/newsroom/AC_70-2.pdf.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by U.S. Department Of Transportation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

U.S. Department Of Transportation. "New Laser Warning And Reporting System For Pilots." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050112194231.htm>.
U.S. Department Of Transportation. (2005, January 15). New Laser Warning And Reporting System For Pilots. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050112194231.htm
U.S. Department Of Transportation. "New Laser Warning And Reporting System For Pilots." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050112194231.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

AP (July 18, 2014) The Obama administration approved the use of sonic cannons to discover deposits under the ocean floor by shooting sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine through waters shared by endangered whales and turtles. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Newsy (July 18, 2014) The wreckage of the German submarine U-166 has become clearly visible for the first time since it was discovered in 2001. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Reuters - US Online Video (July 17, 2014) President Barak Obama stopped by at a lunch counter in Delaware before making remarks about boosting the nation's infrastructure. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

TheStreet (July 16, 2014) Oil Futures are bouncing back after tumbling below $100 a barrel for the first time since May yesterday. Jeff Grossman is the president of BRG Brokerage and trades at the NYMEX. Grossman tells TheStreet the Middle East is always a concern for oil traders. Oil prices were pushed down in recent weeks on Libya increasing its production. Supply disruptions in Iraq fading also contributed to prices falling. News from China's economic front showing a growth for the second quarter also calmed fears on its slowdown. Jeff Grossman talks to TheStreet's Susannah Lee on this and more on the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins