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Implications For The Archaeology Of Warfare In The Andes

Date:
January 26, 2005
Source:
University Of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
Using pre-Columbia Andean South American as a case study, Elizabeth Arkush and Charles Stanish of UCLA further the archaeological debate on the significance of warfare in societal development by re-examining current interpretations of the evidence of ritualized and defensive conflict in the ancient Andes.

Using pre-Columbia Andean South American as a case study, Elizabeth Arkush and Charles Stanish of UCLA further the archaeological debate on the significance of warfare in societal development by re-examining current interpretations of the evidence of ritualized and defensive conflict in the ancient Andes.

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Through their research, Arkush and Stanish propose that the incorrect interpretation of defensive architecture, ceremonial activity, and ritualized conflict has led previous scholars to discard warfare as an explanation or recast it as non-serious "ritual battle." In an article that appears in the February 2005 issue of Current Anthropology, Arkush and Stanish argue that this misinterpretation has lead to an overly peaceful vision of the Andean past.

Counterexamples from societies documented in ethnography and history demonstrate that defensive walls may have features that seem counterintuitive to the modern scholar, that sites may be both ceremonial and defensive, and that ritualized warfare may devastate populations and cause political change. Further, while a special form of ritual battle has existed for centuries in the Andes, it is often used inappropriately as an analogy for pre-Columbian conflict.

Arkush and Stanish contend that warfare in the Andes was more prevalent and destructive than is currently thought. A better understanding of the archaeological signatures of warfare, grounded in known examples, should clarify the course of war and peace in the Andes and other world regions.


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The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Chicago Press Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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University Of Chicago Press Journals. "Implications For The Archaeology Of Warfare In The Andes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050123210551.htm>.
University Of Chicago Press Journals. (2005, January 26). Implications For The Archaeology Of Warfare In The Andes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050123210551.htm
University Of Chicago Press Journals. "Implications For The Archaeology Of Warfare In The Andes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050123210551.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

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