Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cancer Vaccines: A Two-pronged Attack?

Date:
January 27, 2005
Source:
Ludwig Institute For Cancer Research
Summary:
The latest findings in cancer vaccine development suggest that cancer vaccines may have two modes of action; specific immunization and non-specific activation of immune cells paralyzed by the tumor.

Brussels (January 17, 2005) -- The latest findings in cancer vaccine development suggest that cancer vaccines may have two modes of action; specific immunization and non-specific activation of immune cells paralyzed by the tumor.

Related Articles


The human immune system fights cancer partly through the production of many populations of specialized immune cells called cytolytic T cells (CTL). Each CTL population recognizes a different, specific marker, an 'antigen', on the cancer cell surface. Cancer vaccines are designed to tip the balance in favor of the immune system by stimulating the production of CTLs against the particular antigen in the vaccine. However, in back-to-back articles published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, investigators at the Brussels Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) and Brussel's Louvain University have shown that a cancer vaccine not only specifically stimulates the production of CTLs against the vaccine antigen, it also non-specifically activates spontaneously produced CTL populations against multiple cancer antigens.

According to Dr. Thierry Boon, the Director of the LICR Brussels Branch, this observation opens a new way of thinking about how cancer vaccines might work. "We have always thought that cancer vaccines could only be effective if massive numbers of vaccine-specific CTLs were produced. But it seems that, in about 10% of patients with metastatic melanoma, the vaccine might actually be reawakening different CTL populations that have been effectively deactivated by the tumor."

The research team also found that metastases were enriched with inactive CTLs, and they are now assessing exactly how vaccination can 'spark' the reactivation of CTLs. "We believe that these CTLs in the metastatic lesions could potentially eliminate the bulk of the tumor," says Dr. Boon. "Now we have to elucidate why this non-specific process works in some patients and not in others, and then to learn how to harness this effect to help even more people with cancer."

###

This study was published by a team comprised of researchers from the Brussels Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Louvain University, Belgium, and the Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Liege University, Liege, Belgium.

The Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) is the largest international academic institute dedicated to understanding and controlling cancer. With ten Branches in seven countries, and numerous Affiliates and Clinical Trial Centers in many others, the scientific network that is LICR quite literally covers the globe. The uniqueness of LICR lies not only in its size and scale, but also in its philosophy and ability to drive its results from the laboratory into the clinic. LICR has developed an impressive portfolio of reagents, knowledge, expertise, and intellectual property, and has also assembled the personnel, facilities, and practices necessary to patent, clinically evaluate, license, and thus translate, the most promising aspects of its own laboratory research into cancer therapies.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ludwig Institute For Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ludwig Institute For Cancer Research. "Cancer Vaccines: A Two-pronged Attack?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050126112737.htm>.
Ludwig Institute For Cancer Research. (2005, January 27). Cancer Vaccines: A Two-pronged Attack?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050126112737.htm
Ludwig Institute For Cancer Research. "Cancer Vaccines: A Two-pronged Attack?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050126112737.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins